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      11-29-2013, 02:39 PM   #1
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BPMsport S65 Refresher / E46 Build / Forensic Knock Analysis

BPMSport S65 Refresher / E46 Build / Forensic Knock Analysis

Preface:


Being that the E9x M3 is the last Generation of the S65 V8, we wanted to have a “pristine” example of our 12/07 build E90 M3 Sedan. The S65 V8’s are in high demand given that the E9x M3 line is being phased out for the newer inline six turbo motors. This coupled with the ongoing bearing clearance debacles that many of you are familiar with and our desire for an “S65” project prompted the reasons for this build. We all know that there is nothing like a naturally aspirated V8 that rev’s to almost 9K RPM!


S65 Engine Availability:

Checking BMW availability of the S65 engine solidified our decision to go this route. Checking all of the BMW parts distribution warehouses, (Ontario, DMDC LA, Jacksonville, Nazareth) shows something a bit disturbing… Not ONE single S65 appears to be in any of BMW’s United States parts distribution centers. Checking a bit further into the availability system, there were only two S65’s showing available in Germany. Well, now there is only one left as of today (11/18/2013 1:30PM)! In three weeks the S65 engine will be traveling from Germany until it reaches Los Angeles to be installed into our 2008 M3 E90 Sedan. We had thoughts in the past about doing a low compression build, or a supercharger – but at the end of the day we were interested in retaining a pristine example of the high revving naturally aspirated V8 that we have all come to know and love. Not many cars behave with such prediction. (Update: Checked today 11/29, quantity now shows zero.)
So… why go with a new engine instead of rebuilding the current one? A few reasons. The production date of the engine in our E90 M3 was 01/2007, which is one of the first S65’s around. In fact, our E90 M3 has a build date of 12/2007, and is one of the first V8 M3’s to ever hit the United States. Having programmed over a thousand M3’s in over twenty five different countries, most of the build dates are 03/08 or greater, and the earliest build date we’ve ever seen was 11/07. Our M3 has gone through a few oil analysis reports from Blackstone Labs throughout its life, and high levels of lead have been a consistent issue on these reports. This was very concerning and disheartening, especially since every measure to ensure this engine was properly cared for was taken. Oil and filter changes were performed at no more than 6,000 mile intervals. The engine never exceeded 3,000 RPM’s when cold. In fact, we started offering our cold start rev limit reduction feature because we were very concerned that the life of these engines was being reduced by high RPM activity before the infamous TWS oil reached operating viscosity. It’s one thing when you’ve purchased a used car and are not sure if the previous owner exercised caution and care – and another when the car is delivered with two miles on the odometer and you’re fully aware of its complete history. For a car that was meticulously maintained at more than twice the factory intervals, it was certainly a bit frustrating to see elevated levels of lead on every report.



Track Testing:

This engine served us very well and held up under extreme conditions. Back in September 2012, we tested our 240E software on the track in 100F + ambient temperatures with oil temperatures meeting or exceeding 300F on the three cars we brought out – our 2008 E90, a 2012 E92 and a 2012 E93. All of them performed flawlessly. The E90 did have warnings about over temperature but never skipped a beat. This is likely due to the crankshaft pulley slightly under driving the water pump as the other two cars had the stock crankshaft pulley and did not trigger this warning. Given this, the crankshaft pulley will likely be removed and put back to stock to ensure that coolant temperatures are kept in check during more extreme driving events. In our latest software, aside from offering the coldstart rev limit protection when the motor is cold, we have also modified the temperatures at which the vehicle reduces the RPM limit based on oil temperature, coolant temperature, and transmission oil temperature. This ensures that the engine remains safe even with the most brutal of beatings on the track in extreme conditions. This goes above and beyond BMW’s programmed protection levels to ensure the S65 continues to deliver for years to come. In the latest 240E software version, BMW actually allowed the engine oil temperature to rise 5C more than previous versions before a redline restriction was enacted.















Combustion Quality Discussion:

Another important thing to note is the amount of knock/detonation the vehicle sees, especially in extreme conditions and with 91 octane gas. There are a few different forms of combustion quality problems that the MSS60 control unit detects. Combustion misfires are an issue with these engines and can be caused by a number of reasons. Things that can cause combustion misfires are as follows:
Hardware issues, fuel quality, faulty or fouled spark plugs, faulty ignition coils, fuel pump or pressure regulation problems, camshaft or crankshaft sensor problems, idle control valve problems, oxygen sensor problems, etc.. This is not a complete list.
As you can see, quite a number of issues can cause combustion misfires. The MSS60 does not have conventional methods of listening for ‘knock’ – rather, it uses feedback form the coils and plugs to detect combustion quality. The DME recognizes and records two main forms of misfires: ‘standard’ misfires, and misfires with combustion deterioration. The latter is a more severe form and will cause limp mode as such events can damage the catalytic converter and have a more pronounced effect on the engine.
If requested, we can go into an extremely technical discussion on this. This is a VERY sophisticated system and in our opinion, the window for which the system triggers safety mechanisms leaves much to be desired. Why do we say this? Because the misfire detection system has programmed windows in which to trigger faults, issues with combustion that are not frequent within a short time frame are not causing service engine soon lights. One thing that we have religiously seen in almost every S65 motor is that the count of misfires and misfires with combustion deterioration is religiously higher in cylinders #3 and #7. About 8 months ago, our E90 M3 was misfiring on cylinder three and this was tracked down to a faulty coil. However, in more than one situation, we’ve seen extremely high differentials on S65’s we’ve checked in the amount of logged events per cylinder. As an example, before tuning a customer’s vehicle about 3 or 4 months ago, we checked logs from the DME. What we found is that cylinder 7 had over 10,000 misfire events – while the other cylinders had less than 1,000. No check engine light. This is alarming – as the differential here clearly signifies an issue with the plug, coil, Ignition wiring, injector, etc.. Because these events were spread out over such a lengthy period of time, the window was missed for triggering any alarms that there may be a potential issue here.
We have been investigating this, and working on modifying the windows for fault code triggering. We’ve also been testing selective reductions in ignition timing in specific cylinders based on a number of different measurements of combustion quality as read from the plugs and coils.

The Build (E90):

-New S65 (Currently on the way from Germany - pictures will be added on arrival)
-VibraTechnics motor mounts
-New Factory Clutch
-New Factory Flywheel





(The new starter and alternator was purchased for two reasons. #1 being that we want the E9x to have all of the freshest components, and #2 because it completes our automatic start/stop retrofit from months ago by upgrading the components to the latest and greatest versions built for these features.

http://www.m3post.com/forums/showthread.php?t=731085



Pictures of the following items will be posted when picked up from the McKenna BMW Parts Dept:
-New Starter
-New Alternator
-New Precat Oxygen Sensors
-8 New Coil Packs
The low pressure fuel sensor, throttle actuators, and idle control value were already replaced in the last 10K miles as they are the most common failure points in the E9x M3.
We also cleaned the Akra TI tips using a brush a denatured alcohol to refresh them. Here are a couple pics before polishing:





We’ve also got a Mode Carbon CF Front spoiler collecting dust for the last six months, so might as well put that on too! It’s really a quality piece.

E46 Build:

Part of the inspiration from this build came from this picture:


Thanks to jphughan for the pic.

It’s still undecided at this point, but since we’ll have a spare S65 motor left over, we’ve been toying with the idea of dropping this into an E46. One of our customers has been setting quite a few records with his BPM Stage II Tuned E92 M3, and it would be exciting to see him tear it up in an E46 Track build powered by an S65 V8 powerplant. A link will be added when the thread on his car is posted.
While in Vegas after SEMA, we spent some time mapping out the wiring and electronics for the build. We wanted the car to have the same type of security that a factory BMW would have. After spending a few hours, we finished up the schematic and wiring for the build. The same key that starts the E90 M3, will also start the S65 Powered E46. This is often one of the biggest hurdles when putting an S65 powerplant in another chassis, and we are happy that this part of the project is ready to be put in motion. For now we are trying to decide whether to start with an E46 M3 shell or a complete car. As far as the motor, we will be checking the clearances and then likely have some work done to the crank/journals, as well as replacing the rod bearings to ensure that it consistently delivers on the track for years to come. We’ll definitely post more pictures of the S65 refresher in the E90, as well as the motor that will be going in the E46 if we continue with this project. For now we’ll leave you with a couple shots pre-engine removal. We also took samples that will be sent out to Blackstone Labs







The most painful part will be going through the 1,200 mile break in. The tune will be modified to prevent any sort of temptation during that period! We’ll certainly be back with more pictures and information as the build of the E90 reaches completion.
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Last edited by THE TECH; 12-23-2013 at 10:54 AM.
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      11-29-2013, 02:46 PM   #2
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Great thread! Can't wait to see the E46 build
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      11-29-2013, 03:37 PM   #3
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it was a fun read.

it looks like if anyone needs a new S65 motor under warranty in years to come, BMW is going to have to make one in Germany then ship it over to the US if you live here. haha that will take forever.
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      11-29-2013, 03:45 PM   #4
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Sounds like a fun project!
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      11-29-2013, 03:48 PM   #5
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Very nice.
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      11-29-2013, 06:11 PM   #6
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Wow! that's really cool and looking forward to informative insights as always!

Given how difficult it is to source a new engine now, can't imagine how it will be in 3-5 yrs??!
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      11-29-2013, 06:20 PM   #7
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Thats an interesting read...especially the section on combustion quality. Any theories on why cylinder #7 suffers a higher rate of misfires than the rest?
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      11-29-2013, 07:55 PM   #8
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Great read on the combustion quality! Not a lot of people know how this work at all on this engine or the S85, and its always good to get even more insight on this topic!

Spark plugs play such a major role on health and safety on these engines, I assume that is why bmw recommends to change them in such quick intervals. Also good to have a fresh set of plugs on these motors, esp more so when modded to make sure your hitting timing targets.

Good stuff man! Always good to see you on M5board aswell, you have helped me out numerous times.
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      11-29-2013, 11:57 PM   #9
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Interesting... love the E46 idea
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      11-30-2013, 01:34 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by THE TECH View Post
BPMSport S65 Refresher / E46 Build / Forensic Knock Analysis

Preface:


Being that the E9x M3 is the last Generation of the S65 V8, we wanted to have a “pristine” example of our 12/07 build E90 M3 Sedan. The S65 V8’s are in high demand given that the E9x M3 line is being phased out for the newer inline six turbo motors. This coupled with the ongoing bearing clearance debacles that many of you are familiar with and our desire for an “S65” project prompted the reasons for this build. We all know that there is nothing like a naturally aspirated V8 that rev’s to almost 9K RPM!

S65 Engine Availability:

Checking BMW availability of the S65 engine solidified our decision to go this route. Checking all of the BMW parts distribution warehouses, (Ontario, DMDC LA, Jacksonville, Nazareth) shows something a bit disturbing… Not ONE single S65 appears to be in any of BMW’s United States parts distribution centers. Checking a bit further into the availability system, there were only two S65’s showing available in Germany. Well, now there is only one left as of today (11/18/2013 1:30PM)! In three weeks the S65 engine will be traveling from Germany until it reaches Los Angeles to be installed into our 2008 M3 E90 Sedan. We had thoughts in the past about doing a low compression build, or a supercharger – but at the end of the day we were interested in retaining a pristine example of the high revving naturally aspirated V8 that we have all come to know and love. Not many cars behave with such prediction. (Update: Checked today 11/29, quantity now shows zero.)
So… why go with a new engine instead of rebuilding the current one? A few reasons. The production date of the engine in our E90 M3 was 01/2007, which is one of the first S65’s around. In fact, our E90 M3 has a build date of 12/2007, and is one of the first V8 M3’s to ever hit the United States. Having programmed over a thousand M3’s in over twenty five different countries, most of the build dates are 03/08 or greater, and the earliest build date we’ve ever seen was 11/07. Our M3 has gone through a few oil analysis reports from Blackstone Labs throughout its life, and high levels of lead have been a consistent issue on these reports. This was very concerning and disheartening, especially since every measure to ensure this engine was properly cared for was taken. Oil and filter changes were performed at no more than 6,000 mile intervals. The engine never exceeded 3,000 RPM’s when cold. In fact, we started offering our cold start rev limit reduction feature because we were very concerned that the life of these engines was being reduced by high RPM activity before the infamous TWS oil reached operating viscosity. It’s one thing when you’ve purchased a used car and are not sure if the previous owner exercised caution and care – and another when the car is delivered with two miles on the odometer and you’re fully aware of its complete history. For a car that was meticulously maintained at more than twice the factory intervals, it was certainly a bit frustrating to see elevated levels of lead on every report.

Track Testing:

This engine served us very well and held up under extreme conditions. Back in September 2012, we tested our 240E software on the track in 100F + ambient temperatures with oil temperatures meeting or exceeding 300F on the three cars we brought out – our 2008 E90, a 2012 E92 and a 2012 E93. All of them performed flawlessly. The E90 did have warnings about over temperature but never skipped a beat. This is likely due to the crankshaft pulley slightly under driving the water pump as the other two cars had the stock crankshaft pulley and did not trigger this warning. Given this, the crankshaft pulley will likely be removed and put back to stock to ensure that coolant temperatures are kept in check during more extreme driving events. In our latest software, aside from offering the coldstart rev limit protection when the motor is cold, we have also modified the temperatures at which the vehicle reduces the RPM limit based on oil temperature, coolant temperature, and transmission oil temperature. This ensures that the engine remains safe even with the most brutal of beatings on the track in extreme conditions. This goes above and beyond BMW’s programmed protection levels to ensure the S65 continues to deliver for years to come. In the latest 240E software version, BMW actually allowed the engine oil temperature to rise 5C more than previous versions before a redline restriction was enacted.

Combustion Quality Discussion:

Another important thing to note is the amount of knock/detonation the vehicle sees, especially in extreme conditions and with 91 octane gas. There are a few different forms of combustion quality problems that the MSS60 control unit detects. Combustion misfires are an issue with these engines and can be caused by a number of reasons. Things that can cause combustion misfires are as follows:
Hardware issues, fuel quality, faulty or fouled spark plugs, faulty ignition coils, fuel pump or pressure regulation problems, camshaft or crankshaft sensor problems, idle control valve problems, oxygen sensor problems, etc.. This is not a complete list.
As you can see, quite a number of issues can cause combustion misfires. The MSS60 does not have conventional methods of listening for ‘knock’ – rather, it uses feedback form the coils and plugs to detect combustion quality. The DME recognizes and records two main forms of misfires: ‘standard’ misfires, and misfires with combustion deterioration. The latter is a more severe form and will cause limp mode as such events can damage the catalytic converter and have a more pronounced effect on the engine.
If requested, we can go into an extremely technical discussion on this. This is a VERY sophisticated system and in our opinion, the window for which the system triggers safety mechanisms leaves much to be desired. Why do we say this? Because the misfire detection system has programmed windows in which to trigger faults, issues with combustion that are not frequent within a short time frame are not causing service engine soon lights. One thing that we have religiously seen in almost every S65 motor is that the count of misfires and misfires with combustion deterioration is religiously higher in cylinders #3 and #7. About 8 months ago, our E90 M3 was misfiring on cylinder three and this was tracked down to a faulty coil. However, in more than one situation, we’ve seen extremely high differentials on S65’s we’ve checked in the amount of logged events per cylinder. As an example, before tuning a customer’s vehicle about 3 or 4 months ago, we checked logs from the DME. What we found is that cylinder 7 had over 10,000 misfire events – while the other cylinders had less than 1,000. No check engine light. This is alarming – as the differential here clearly signifies an issue with the plug, coil, Ignition wiring, injector, etc.. Because these events were spread out over such a lengthy period of time, the window was missed for triggering any alarms that there may be a potential issue here.
We have been investigating this, and working on modifying the windows for fault code triggering. We’ve also been testing selective reductions in ignition timing in specific cylinders based on a number of different measurements of combustion quality as read from the plugs and coils.

The Build (E90):

-New S65 (Currently on the way from Germany - pictures will be added on arrival)
-VibraTechnics motor mounts
-New Factory Clutch
-New Factory Flywheel

(The new starter and alternator was purchased for two reasons. #1 being that we want the E9x to have all of the freshest components, and #2 because it completes our automatic start/stop retrofit from months ago by upgrading the components to the latest and greatest versions built for these features.

Pictures of the following items will be posted when picked up from the McKenna BMW Parts Dept:
-New Starter
-New Alternator
-New Precat Oxygen Sensors
-8 New Coil Packs
The low pressure fuel sensor, throttle actuators, and idle control value were already replaced in the last 10K miles as they are the most common failure points in the E9x M3.
We also cleaned the Akra TI tips using a brush a denatured alcohol to refresh them. Here are a couple pics before polishing:

We’ve also got a Mode Carbon CF Front spoiler collecting dust for the last six months, so might as well put that on too! It’s really a quality piece.

E46 Build:

Part of the inspiration from this build came from this picture:

It’s still undecided at this point, but since we’ll have a spare S65 motor left over, we’ve been toying with the idea of dropping this into an E46. One of our customers has been setting quite a few records with his BPM Stage II Tuned E92 M3, and it would be exciting to see him tear it up in an E46 Track build powered by an S65 V8 powerplant. A link will be added when the thread on his car is posted.
While in Vegas after SEMA, we spent some time mapping out the wiring and electronics for the build. We wanted the car to have the same type of security that a factory BMW would have. After spending a few hours, we finished up the schematic and wiring for the build. The same key that starts the E90 M3, will also start the S65 Powered E46. This is often one of the biggest hurdles when putting an S65 powerplant in another chassis, and we are happy that this part of the project is ready to be put in motion. For now we are trying to decide whether to start with an E46 M3 shell or a complete car. As far as the motor, we will be checking the clearances and then likely have some work done to the crank/journals, as well as replacing the rod bearings to ensure that it consistently delivers on the track for years to come. We’ll definitely post more pictures of the S65 refresher in the E90, as well as the motor that will be going in the E46 if we continue with this project. For now we’ll leave you with a couple shots pre-engine removal. We also took samples that will be sent out to Blackstone Labs

The most painful part will be going through the 1,200 mile break in. The tune will be modified to prevent any sort of temptation during that period! We’ll certainly be back with more pictures and information as the build of the E90 reaches completion.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marco@McKennaPerformance View Post
Great thread! Can't wait to see the E46 build
Quote:
Originally Posted by SenorFunkyPants View Post
Thats an interesting read...especially the section on combustion quality. Any theories on why cylinder #7 suffers a higher rate of misfires than the rest?
It's a sad that a stupid ban has prevented Mike Benvo from being involved with the S65 bearing discussion. It looks like there is more to what we have been discussing in the other thread.

Shame on you for slapping a political ban on a sponsor and a valued and respected forum member like Mike. It's a free world and people are entitled to their opinion. And guess what, truth does hurt but one should be man enough to take it.

Good luck Mike and the team at BPM with the project and to others for support and inspiration to the BMP team.

Well Done!
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      11-30-2013, 01:53 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aussiem3 View Post
It's a sad that a stupid ban has prevented Mike Benvo from being involved with the S65 bearing discussion. It looks like there is more to what we have been discussing in the other thread.

Shame on you for slapping a political ban on a sponsor and a valued and respected forum member like Mike. It's a free world and people are entitled to their opinion. And guess what, truth does hurt but one should be man enough to take it.

Good luck Mike and the team at BPM with the project and to others for support and inspiration to the BMP team.

Well Done!
Amen. Free Benvo!
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      11-30-2013, 11:34 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aussiem3 View Post
It's a sad that a stupid ban has prevented Mike Benvo from being involved with the S65 bearing discussion. It looks like there is more to what we have been discussing in the other thread.

Shame on you for slapping a political ban on a sponsor and a valued and respected forum member like Mike. It's a free world and people are entitled to their opinion. And guess what, truth does hurt but one should be man enough to take it.

Good luck Mike and the team at BPM with the project and to others for support and inspiration to the BMP team.

Well Done!
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hujan View Post
Amen. Free Benvo!
Thanks for the support guys but if we can, let's keep it on topic.
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      11-30-2013, 12:11 PM   #13
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I'm curious about your thoughts on the new vibra-technics engine mounts. Also, pics of the rod + main bearings out of the e90 M3. Great project and thread!
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      11-30-2013, 03:44 PM   #14
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Why not run out the original motor or rebuild that one so there is proper clearances if there is excessive bearing wear? You state there are a few reasons why you guys decided to go the new engine route, but you don't actually state any real reasons other than because the production date on the motor was very early, and that you got elevated lead levels from Blackstone Labs reports. If in fact BMW made the clearances too tight for the TVS oil, then that will still be the case with a new factory motor- as there have been instances of newer motors having high wear.

As a tuner, I would think that you would want to run your tune as long as possible in your original motor/development car to display the longevity and safety of your tune. If bearings are the issue, why not just address that problem? And why would you consider putting this in an E46 if it's not good enough for the original car it came out of?
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      11-30-2013, 04:31 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SYZ View Post
Why not run out the original motor or rebuild that one so there is proper clearances if there is excessive bearing wear? You state there are a few reasons why you guys decided to go the new engine route, but you don't actually state any real reasons other than because the production date on the motor was very early, and that you got elevated lead levels from Blackstone Labs reports. If in fact BMW made the clearances too tight for the TVS oil, then that will still be the case with a new factory motor- as there have been instances of newer motors having high wear.

As a tuner, I would think that you would want to run your tune as long as possible in your original motor/development car to display the longevity and safety of your tune. If bearings are the issue, why not just address that problem? And why would you consider putting this in an E46 if it's not good enough for the original car it came out of?
AFAIK BMW didn't make any changes to the S65 during its entire run, other than phasing out lead bearings. Unless the old engine has more mechanical issues, there is nothing to gain by swapping it out.
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      11-30-2013, 06:57 PM   #16
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Nice! Can't wait to see more on this project!
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      11-30-2013, 07:38 PM   #17
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cant wait to see more of this, keep up the good work
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      12-01-2013, 12:15 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SYZ View Post
Why not run out the original motor or rebuild that one so there is proper clearances if there is excessive bearing wear? You state there are a few reasons why you guys decided to go the new engine route, but you don't actually state any real reasons other than because the production date on the motor was very early, and that you got elevated lead levels from Blackstone Labs reports. If in fact BMW made the clearances too tight for the TVS oil, then that will still be the case with a new factory motor- as there have been instances of newer motors having high wear.

As a tuner, I would think that you would want to run your tune as long as possible in your original motor/development car to display the longevity and safety of your tune. If bearings are the issue, why not just address that problem? And why would you consider putting this in an E46 if it's not good enough for the original car it came out of?
Why not run out the original motor or rebuild that one so there is proper clearances if there is excessive bearing wear? You state there are a few reasons why you guys decided to go the new engine route, but you don't actually state any real reasons other than because the production date on the motor was very early, and that you got elevated lead levels from Blackstone Labs reports.

>> We are planning on rebuilding the original motor and putting it in the E46 (or whatever other chassis we decide to put it in). We will have the clearances and crank checked as well, and based on that formulate a gameplan for the build.

If in fact BMW made the clearances too tight for the TVS oil, then that will still be the case with a new factory motor- as there have been instances of newer motors having high wear.

>> We are not engine building experts and will defer to them on explanations related to oil viscosity and clearance issues. Something of significance is the fact that the bearing part number changed, which means the new motor will have the revised bearings. If the clearances are in-fact the same, perhaps it's the material the bearing is made out of that may be causing the accelerated wear in the previous revisions. This is more of a question for an engine hardware specialist.

As a tuner, I would think that you would want to run your tune as long as possible in your original motor/development car to display the longevity and safety of your tune. If bearings are the issue, why not just address that problem? And why would you consider putting this in an E46 if it's not good enough for the original car it came out of?

>> There is no dispute as to the longetivity of our software. We have customers with over 100K on the clock (This doesn't mean that they were tuned at 0mi). We have customers that have dedicated track and drift vehicles which get quite more abuse than an occasionally tracked M3 would see. Bottom end issues would rarely be related to tuning. If the car is experiencing high levels of detonation, this could have an impact on the bottom end. Considering we do not remove any factory safeguards or run ignition timing targets much higher than stock cars, our software should be as safe as the factory software in terms of engine longetivity. It could also be argued that in some cases our software may be safer due to the enhanced RPM limit reduction when cold, as well as the enhanced protection for hot oil and coolant temperatures that goes above the factory restrictions in stock software for protecting the engine in extreme conditions.

We'll make sure to document everything once the old motor is dissesembled.

Thanks!
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      12-01-2013, 12:16 PM   #19
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Originally Posted by speedaddictM3 View Post
AFAIK BMW didn't make any changes to the S65 during its entire run, other than phasing out lead bearings. Unless the old engine has more mechanical issues, there is nothing to gain by swapping it out.
We’d prefer the older motor to be in the track build, and keep the E90 as a pristine example of the E9x M3. It’s also getting brand new factory brake pads and rotors. It’s our version of a 2013 E90 M3 you could say
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      12-01-2013, 12:24 PM   #20
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very cool! can't wait to see what they do next. I'm stupid satisfied with BPM software. Would also like to hear more about what you're doing to maximize the life of the engine re: bearing debacle.

+1 about the vibratechnics mounts as well. Would like more info on these

p.s. free Benvo!
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      12-01-2013, 02:33 PM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by THE TECH View Post
If in fact BMW made the clearances too tight for the TVS oil, then that will still be the case with a new factory motor- as there have been instances of newer motors having high wear.

>> We are not engine building experts and will defer to them on explanations related to oil viscosity and clearance issues. Something of significance is the fact that the bearing part number changed, which means the new motor will have the revised bearings. If the clearances are in-fact the same, perhaps it's the material the bearing is made out of that may be causing the accelerated wear in the previous revisions. This is more of a question for an engine hardware specialist.
The bearings were changed to comply with EU regulations to remove lead from the bearings. The new bearings are much harder than the older ones. The clearances are the same. I'd prefer the older softer bearings to the newer harder ones. More details and specifications are discussed in the bearing wiki thread.
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      12-03-2013, 05:25 AM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by THE TECH View Post
Forensic Knock Analysis
Am I right in understanding that the ECU operates a fixed range of ignition advance....for example say from 12 - 32 degrees on a stock car?
And if so, if a tuner was to create an aggressive ignition map which raised the ignition advance target to say 37 degrees...would the consequence of that be the other end of the range would be also be raised...ie the new range would become 17 - 37 degrees?
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