BMW M3 Forum (E90 E92)

BMW Garage BMW Meets Register Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read


Go Back   M3Post - BMW M3 Forum > BIMMERPOST Universal Forums > Off-Topic Discussions Board
 
Evolve Automotive
Post Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
      09-24-2013, 09:37 AM   #1
Cio
New Member
 
Drives: 335i on order
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Seaside, CA

Posts: 23
iTrader: (0)

Bachelors of Science in COMPUTER SCIENCE... guidance?

Greetings all,

I'm currently working contracting jobs in the intelligence field. The pay is pretty decent (60k+), but the job locations are very limited (and contracting isn't stable at all). I was thinking of going back into school to get into a software related job, which is abundant and paying well (and probably better) anywhere.

Can anybody in school or in the field shed some light on the topic?

It would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks
Cio is offline  
0
Reply With Quote
      09-24-2013, 10:53 AM   #2
jlspeed29
Major
 
jlspeed29's Avatar
 
Drives: 13 C300 Sport
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: BOS now..formerly SoCal

Posts: 1,169
iTrader: (0)

Garage List
2008 335 coupe  [4.00]
my ex was a CS major...finance for me...shes a baller, i'm not
__________________
Retired: 08E92xZSPxSTYLE230xSADDLExPDCxPADDLExCOMFORT/JB3 tune
Current: 13 w204/white/sport/dynamica-amg interior/multimedia/rear roof spoiler/trunk spoiler/heated seats

A fisherman always sees another fisherman from afar
jlspeed29 is offline  
0
Reply With Quote
      09-24-2013, 12:11 PM   #3
Hawkeye
Brigadier General
 
Hawkeye's Avatar
 
Drives: '07 Z4 si Coupe, '08 R6
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Holland

Posts: 3,594
iTrader: (0)

Garage List
A lot of CS jobs do not pay as well as you'd think (out of the gates at least) unless you are an expert in certain systems and know your shit well.
__________________
2007 Z4 3.0si Coupe 6 MT Black Saphire Metallic PP SP Heated M Seats Clutch Stop Stubby
2008 R6 Raven Black GPR Steering Stabilizer Comp Werks FE Hotbodies Flush Mount Blinkers
2008 Nissan Titan XE King Cab Long Bed 4x4 Line-X
Hawkeye is offline   No_Country
0
Reply With Quote
      09-24-2013, 04:44 PM   #4
PSUSMU
Captain
 
Drives: Entry-level Luxury
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Falls Church, VA

Posts: 809
iTrader: (1)

It depends what you want to do. Some things can be self-taught without investing in a college degree (i.e. web development). Other positions (gov't jobs/sw-systems engineer/system analyst/project engineer) may require minimum B.S.
__________________
RSI, LLC | Fender Rolling | Suspension | Other Stuff
PSUSMU is offline  
0
Reply With Quote
      09-24-2013, 05:27 PM   #5
radix
there's something different about him
 
radix's Avatar
 
Drives: -
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: -

Posts: 896
iTrader: (0)

Quote:
Originally Posted by PSUSMU View Post
It depends what you want to do. Some things can be self-taught without investing in a college degree (i.e. web development). Other positions (gov't jobs/sw-systems engineer/system analyst/project engineer) may require minimum B.S.
I would disagree for sw-systems engineer. I was an AIX development support engineer for IBM and have never spent a single day in college. If you are sufficiently good, doors will be opened for you.

EDIT:

Although to both our points, they rewrote the job specification to accommodate me.

Last edited by radix; 09-24-2013 at 05:32 PM. Reason: clarification
radix is offline   Philippines
0
Reply With Quote
      09-24-2013, 05:55 PM   #6
PSUSMU
Captain
 
Drives: Entry-level Luxury
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Falls Church, VA

Posts: 809
iTrader: (1)

Quote:
Originally Posted by jh valley View Post
I would disagree for sw-systems engineer. I was an AIX development support engineer for IBM and have never spent a single day in college. If you are sufficiently good, doors will be opened for you.

EDIT:

Although to both our points, they rewrote the job specification to accommodate me.
"AIX development support engineer" is not what I'm referring to with SW/Systems Engineer. Software/Systems Engineering requires more domain knowledge than knowing a specific OS (i.e. SDLC/SELC and solving complex problems that require industry experience rather than the ability to Google an answer). Architecting complex IT solutions without having experience across different IT functions isn't something you can just spend some time self-studying to accomplish.
__________________
RSI, LLC | Fender Rolling | Suspension | Other Stuff
PSUSMU is offline  
0
Reply With Quote
      09-24-2013, 06:09 PM   #7
radix
there's something different about him
 
radix's Avatar
 
Drives: -
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: -

Posts: 896
iTrader: (0)

Quote:
Originally Posted by PSUSMU View Post
"AIX development support engineer" is not what I'm referring to with SW/Systems Engineer. Software/Systems Engineering requires more domain knowledge than knowing a specific OS (i.e. SDLC/SELC and solving complex problems that require industry experience rather than the ability to Google an answer). Architecting complex IT solutions without having experience across different IT functions isn't something you can just spend some time self-studying to accomplish.
Actually my job was to debug AIX down to the line of source (including kernel, filesystem, and libc) at IBM research in Austin . Considering its closed source nature, is not googleable [is that a word?]. And yes those things can be self taught, lol.
radix is offline   Philippines
0
Reply With Quote
      09-24-2013, 06:22 PM   #8
radix
there's something different about him
 
radix's Avatar
 
Drives: -
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: -

Posts: 896
iTrader: (0)

I guess I didn't really address your point. Prior to moving to IBM I was a Unix System Engineer/Architect working for a different fortune 50 company and worked with various OSes (all Unix based however), hardware, storage systems, and applications, and did create actual solutions to solve business problems. To clarify, I taught myself this (design/capacity planning) as well. I'm just saying it can be done.
radix is offline   Philippines
0
Reply With Quote
      09-25-2013, 07:12 AM   #9
Cio
New Member
 
Drives: 335i on order
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Seaside, CA

Posts: 23
iTrader: (0)

Thanks for the replies, everyone.

Could someone give me the PROs/CONs of their software related job, and also some tips/warnings for someone interested in pursuing the career?

For me, I am trying to assess whether it would be more beneficial to be the person working ON the systems (which would require the BS in CS), or continue working off systems as the analyst as i currently do.

Salary is ofc a strong incentive, but the flexibility of working on software anywhere is what interests me.

Once again, thank you for sharing your time.
Cio is offline  
0
Reply With Quote
      09-25-2013, 07:40 AM   #10
Greenkirby21
Vrooom :)
 
Greenkirby21's Avatar
 
Drives: C7 Stringray
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Dream Land

Posts: 2,607
iTrader: (1)

Send a message via AIM to Greenkirby21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cio
Thanks for the replies, everyone.

Could someone give me the PROs/CONs of their software related job, and also some tips/warnings for someone interested in pursuing the career?

For me, I am trying to assess whether it would be more beneficial to be the person working ON the systems (which would require the BS in CS), or continue working off systems as the analyst as i currently do.

Salary is ofc a strong incentive, but the flexibility of working on software anywhere is what interests me.

Once again, thank you for sharing your time.
Well I have my undergrad in CS and will finish my masters in CS by spring. I'm only 22 so not a lot of experience per say. I got offered 70k starting salary and my masters is being paid for my company, so I consider that well paid, especially since I have many friends who just got off college and still job searching (or many have 40-50k salaries).

What I really like about the CS (or software in general) field is the vast amount of things you can do.

If you like medical stuff, you can go into that field. If you like networking and security, you can do that. Physics people always need good programmers to create simulation models for them. You can do gaming, or even work for car companies. Software is pretty much everywhere . That's the main reason why I chose CS.
__________________
2014 C7 Corvette Stringray - Laguna Blue - NPP Exhaust - Competition Seats
Greenkirby21 is offline   United_States
0
Reply With Quote
      09-25-2013, 07:43 AM   #11
Greenkirby21
Vrooom :)
 
Greenkirby21's Avatar
 
Drives: C7 Stringray
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Dream Land

Posts: 2,607
iTrader: (1)

Send a message via AIM to Greenkirby21
Forgot to add cons. Since I'm still noob i pretty much have to sit in front of a desk for 8 hours a day and code. My legs get tired and my eyes want to burn out from staring at monitors. I love exercise so I am very fidgety and don't want to sit down all day. Can't wait until I become more pro and can attend meetings and stuff
__________________
2014 C7 Corvette Stringray - Laguna Blue - NPP Exhaust - Competition Seats
Greenkirby21 is offline   United_States
0
Reply With Quote
      09-25-2013, 11:35 AM   #12
Whostheboss
Captain
 
Whostheboss's Avatar
 
Drives: a 9incher
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Connecticut U.S.

Posts: 787
iTrader: (0)

I'm a Software engineer for a medical company that builds and designs various medical equipments (Heart rate monitor, ventilators, blenders etc)

I have a BS in Computer science. Your best bet is to find the cheapest college that offers CS. No need to waste your money on big name colleges. At the same time, i will not recommend learning on your own. It can become very tedious. You need the presence of a professor, students, class hall, homework to keep you motivated. If you try to learn on your own.... trust me! YOU WILL GET FRUSTRATED and quit.

Just like Greenkirby21 mentioned, once you've earned your degree, you can apply for ANY job field. I have had 3 jobs after graduated college in 2008. I first worked for a Database EDM company, then i worked for an Aerospace company, now i work for a Medical company. I was getting a lot of job offers (keep in mind this was during the awful recession)

Software is needed in pretty much every field you can think of. My advice is to find a cheap college or even a community college, stay disciplined and make sure you learn your SH!T. Because during job interviews, once they detect that you have confidence, theyll hire you.

You can even start your own company and do what ever you what. I have other side companies that i own (Nothing major). I've done 3 iPhone apps and games. I've designed miniature robots. My next goal is to design an artificial human body that i can try to sell to hospitals to use for training.

To make it short... The world is yours. I say: Yes, do CS, don't pay too much, make sure you learn your stuff. Stay away from online colleges. I prefer normal class rooms, it keeps you disciplined.

Goodluck
__________________
WHO'S THE BOSS
Whostheboss is offline  
0
Reply With Quote
      09-25-2013, 11:48 AM   #13
Whostheboss
Captain
 
Whostheboss's Avatar
 
Drives: a 9incher
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Connecticut U.S.

Posts: 787
iTrader: (0)

Pros:
(1) Pay$$ ($75k average with 4yr exp)
(2) Work with computers (I'd rather deal with annoying computers that deal with annoying customers/ humans
(3) Your creation (It feels good to see your creation come to life)

Cons
(1) Pay$$$ (as a programmer you are max'ed out at about $90k, to make more you need to leave programming and become a software director which typically requires at least 12-15yrs experience)
(2) Stress (pressure and stress is ridiculous when deadlines are approaching and the codes won't work)
(3) Energy loss (After staring at those screen and cracking your brain doing mathematics from 9-5, after worked you will be completely poofed.

Not Con nor Pro
But every now and then, Software changes so vastly that it can become annoying to keep up with... in a way it's good because if you can stay upto date, you are more marketable.
__________________
WHO'S THE BOSS
Whostheboss is offline  
0
Reply With Quote
      09-25-2013, 11:50 AM   #14
Whostheboss
Captain
 
Whostheboss's Avatar
 
Drives: a 9incher
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Connecticut U.S.

Posts: 787
iTrader: (0)

As of 2013... The most marketable Software language you can learn is C#.
__________________
WHO'S THE BOSS
Whostheboss is offline  
0
Reply With Quote
      09-25-2013, 02:35 PM   #15
Cio
New Member
 
Drives: 335i on order
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Seaside, CA

Posts: 23
iTrader: (0)

Great.

This was everything that I was hoping to hear. Much appreciated, everyone; thanks for the guidance.
Cio is offline  
0
Reply With Quote
Post Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:32 PM.




m3post
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.0
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
1Addicts.com, BIMMERPOST.com, E90Post.com, F30Post.com, M3Post.com, ZPost.com, 5Post.com, 6Post.com, 7Post.com, XBimmers.com logo and trademark are properties of BIMMERPOST