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      04-09-2015, 10:24 AM   #1
EJT86
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BBK install question

I'm planning to install Stoptech ST60/40 in a couple weeks once they get back to me from iND. I've read it's a pretty easy install and that the instructions a pretty clear. My question is having never done any brake work before how much time should I clear in order to do the install? Also are there any tips or advice on what precautions to take in order to make sure I don't get a drop of fluid on my freshly painted calipers?
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      04-09-2015, 12:35 PM   #2
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- Get all the correct tools before your calipers arrive.
- Keep a mix of 50% water and 50% rubbing alcohol in a spray bottle handy so if you do spill, you can quickly clean it up
- Buy some 3/8" clear plastic tubing so you can bleed the calipers into a container without worrying about a majority of the fluid leaking onto the caliper
- Be patient. Depending on the condition of your car's original components, you could run into some seized bolts, rust etc. etc. You're also going to be working in a tight space assuming you don't have a lift.
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      04-09-2015, 12:50 PM   #3
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Great thanks...so I guess jack stands are a must? I'll be doing it in my flat drive way...I was also thinking of spreading some Vaseline around the part of the caliper closest to the brake lines. Good idea or no?
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      04-09-2015, 01:07 PM   #4
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If you have never done any brake work before, please get a friend to help that has done brake work.
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      04-09-2015, 01:49 PM   #5
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The questions you are asking and comments you are making leads me to believe that this job may be way over your head. Like mentioned above, have a friend who has experience working on brakes help you. He will be your biggest asset. Otherwise, prepare to have your car down a few days while you figure stuff out as you go along.

For reference, I diy almost all my car projects. I've worked on brakes a lot on other cars and it still took me over 2 days to install my Brembo BBK's since working on my M3's brakes was new to me. I had to figure stuff out as I went along. I ended up having to learn how to adjust the e-brake on my car since the e-brake was not holding on hills with the new rear rotors.

Jack stands are a must as you'll need to have the whole car off the ground to properly bleed the lines. Having a shop manual is also extremely helpful to reference for torques and diagrams. Having all the proper tools is also very important to make sure the parts are installed correctly. You'll also need tin snips to cut the rear rotor dust shields.

Brake bleeding is THE most important part of the install. The brakes won't work properly if the lines aren't bled correctly. I found out that my Motive power bleeder was not good for getting big air bubbles out of the lines. After using the power bleeder 3 times, I ended up bleeding the old school way and got all the air out of the lines.

The one thing I would highly recommend is to wear a dust mask. I inhaled so much brake dust that I ended up getting sick. I'm not sure if this was the exact cause, but I'm sure it didn't help.

Good luck!
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      04-09-2015, 03:13 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marksae View Post
The questions you are asking and comments you are making leads me to believe that this job may be way over your head. Like mentioned above, have a friend who has experience working on brakes help you. He will be your biggest asset. Otherwise, prepare to have your car down a few days while you figure stuff out as you go along.

For reference, I diy almost all my car projects. I've worked on brakes a lot on other cars and it still took me over 2 days to install my Brembo BBK's since working on my M3's brakes was new to me. I had to figure stuff out as I went along. I ended up having to learn how to adjust the e-brake on my car since the e-brake was not holding on hills with the new rear rotors.

Jack stands are a must as you'll need to have the whole car off the ground to properly bleed the lines. Having a shop manual is also extremely helpful to reference for torques and diagrams. Having all the proper tools is also very important to make sure the parts are installed correctly. You'll also need tin snips to cut the rear rotor dust shields.

Brake bleeding is THE most important part of the install. The brakes won't work properly if the lines aren't bled correctly. I found out that my Motive power bleeder was not good for getting big air bubbles out of the lines. After using the power bleeder 3 times, I ended up bleeding the old school way and got all the air out of the lines.

The one thing I would highly recommend is to wear a dust mask. I inhaled so much brake dust that I ended up getting sick. I'm not sure if this was the exact cause, but I'm sure it didn't help.

Good luck!
It's not that I'm not mechanically inclined I've just never had to work on brakes before. Id be a lil more confident if I had an experienced friend but unfortunately I don't and was just hoping to save a lil cash by DIY. Turner said its a 3hr job so that's about $300. From what I gauge from the forums isn't it just basically U bolting the old and bolting on the new? Yes I know rust etc can cause delays but isn't it just basically that until it's time to bleed? Changing rotors doesn't take THAT long
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      04-09-2015, 03:50 PM   #7
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I totally get where you're coming from. Installing your own parts is way more gratifying compared to paying a shop to have it done. Plus you get to learn and gain experience in the process. It all depends on how much time and effort you're willing to put in.

The point of my previus message was to just warn you of hangups of doing something for the first time. Just be prepared for extra down time. Now that I've gone through the whole process once and know what to do, I could probably do it again in 4-5 hours at home. 3 hours at a shop with a lift and all the proper tools sounds about right.

The things that hung me up were:
- figuring out how to take off the stock calipers
- figuring out how to take off the brake pad sensors
- Rotors being stuck to the hubs and not knowing how hard I should be hammering to get them off (this kicked up a lot of brake dust, so wear a mask!)
- Figuring out how to cut the dust shields (fronts were easy, rears were a bit harder)
- bleeding the lines
- adjusting the e-brake (rear wheels need to be off the car for proper adjustment)
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      04-09-2015, 04:08 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EJT86 View Post
It's not that I'm not mechanically inclined I've just never had to work on brakes before. Id be a lil more confident if I had an experienced friend but unfortunately I don't and was just hoping to save a lil cash by DIY. Turner said its a 3hr job so that's about $300. From what I gauge from the forums isn't it just basically U bolting the old and bolting on the new? Yes I know rust etc can cause delays but isn't it just basically that until it's time to bleed? Changing rotors doesn't take THAT long
Have you bled/flushed brakes before? Do you have a pressure bleeder?

If the answer is no to either, you will need either a friend or a pressure bleeder.

The job IS simple, but not for someone who's never tackled brakes before. It's a lot more "involved" than just removing rotors because you will be opening and exposing the entire hydraulic system to air.

Also, I don't know about StopTECHs for E9X M3s, but on E46es it is required to grind down the hub mounting point so the bracket could fit (if I recall). Which means angle grinders.

Other than the brake pressure bleeder, there aren't any specialty fasteners, but it IS very easy to strip the small 14mm nut that secures the hard line to the flex line. If NOTHING ELSE, get a set of flare nut wrenches.
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      04-09-2015, 04:42 PM   #9
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I installed my ST60/40 in a day using jack stands. I did not install the rear inner SS braded lines but did the outer ones attached to the calipers. I installed them later when swapping diff and bushings. You will need to trim the dust guards as per instructions and that will require a dremel and cutting wheel or good pair of metal sheers. The install is easy and straight forward. You will need to do a good flush and bleed afterwards, so make sure you know how to do that correctly.
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      04-09-2015, 05:46 PM   #10
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I see what you mean marksae I guess I'll have to look into adjusting the ebrake as I forgot about that

The hack- As far as I know the only the dust shields need fabrication

Ortho281- for brake flushing I was going to go with this
http://www.turnermotorsport.com/p-17...ple-bleed.aspx
And pump them myself. How much new fluid should I have on hand?
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