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      09-22-2010, 08:22 PM   #1
brandonwuwux3
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void warranty?

if i mod my exhaust or have muffler delete (straightpipe) will this void my warranty? thanks!
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      09-22-2010, 08:39 PM   #2
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you will void your warranty for your exhaust since you'll have to cut and weld a straight pipe if thats what you want to do. it shouldnt void the warranty of the engine.
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      09-22-2010, 08:41 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by montreal red View Post
you will void your warranty for your exhaust since you'll have to cut and weld a straight pipe if thats what you want to do. it shouldnt void the warranty of the engine.
i just care about my engine and drivetrain warranty :O shouldnt affect those right?
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      09-22-2010, 09:28 PM   #4
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If we-tod-id BMW can try to void my buddy's suspension warranty for having a stock car with only aftermarket wheels, then yeah, they can TRY. Not like a reasonable dealer will void it if it's in perfectly working order though, just keep a stock X-pipe handy.
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      09-22-2010, 10:34 PM   #5
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There was a BMWNA TSB a few years back saying that if you altered the exhaust you would lose your entire power train warranty.

YMMV
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      09-26-2010, 09:06 AM   #6
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I'd like to know as well. I'm about to install a new x-pipe.
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      10-03-2010, 09:58 AM   #7
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I asked my service adviser if changing the exhaust will void my warranty and this is what he told me.

"To answer your question, I would need to know what your brand of equipment you are installing. If it is not a BMW performance accessories or Dinan parts, you run the risk of voiding the warranty on any parts involved with the exhaust system. For example, if the exhaust system you are installing causes internal damage to your valves due to improper back flow pressure, then warranty would not cover any repairs.

So I would recommend researching any warranty that is provided by the part manufacturer. "


This has me a little worried. I just installed the Eisemann Sport Exhaust and just ordered the Fabspeed x-pipe w/resonators.

So if something goes wrong with the engine, they may void your warranty if you have an aftermarket exhaust?!

So much for 'peace of mind'.
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      10-03-2010, 10:19 AM   #8
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If you have a relationship with a dealer, discuss your planned work in advance. If the dealer rep indicates no warranty issue, then ask that he sign a written statement to that effect (better to have one prepared in advance for signature). He probably will not sign, and even if he does, his representation of BMWUSA could be questioned. Dealers vary greatly in their support for after-market equipment. There is no doubt that the manufacturer can void your warranty for after-market parts or labor (tuning).

Folks will say that the parts in question must be proven to have caused the problem in order for the warranty to be determined voidable. I'm not a lawyer, but I have read a lot of the language from different makers, and I think this defense is questionable. Should an owner have the patience and money to actually go to court with it, and assuming a good presentation of the case with qualified experts, I think the owner could prevail. But the time, cost, and potential lost use of the car, suggests that going to court is very impractical for most of us.

My advice (guaranteed worth its cost!), is to choose a dealer with a reputation for reasonable behavior in such cases, and try to get an agreement in advance of the work. But never assume the warranty will be there for you later.
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      10-03-2010, 12:46 PM   #9
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Anything other than an axleback exhaust is asking for trouble IMO, especially ANY tunes, as tampering with the ECU in any way is traceable, and specifically prohibited by BMW. But yes, if you insist on doing such a thing, MUCH better to discuss that openly with your dealer, rather than trying to conceal it when something happens. I don't understand the stupid mentality of 'I just change things back and nobody would notice'; it's an insult to the tech's intelligence, and that turns techs/dealer against you. Getting evidence that something was removed is a lot simpler than a lot of folks realize. Once you deny doing/removing something, then all they have to do is prove you were lying . Not worth it IMO. Good luck.

Last edited by elp_jc; 10-03-2010 at 12:54 PM.
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      10-03-2010, 12:50 PM   #10
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It will void your exhaust warranty. For them to void any other part of your warranty they would have to prove that your modification directly caused the damage to that part.
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      10-03-2010, 01:05 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bwalshy99 View Post
It will void your exhaust warranty. For them to void any other part of your warranty they would have to prove that your modification directly caused the damage to that part.
Any monkey knows altering the exhaust can mess with your A/F ratios, and THAT can affect the engine. THAT's the only proof they need. YOU would have to prove your modifications didn't alter A/F ratios in any way; good luck with that.

Finally, the reality is if a dealer/BMW suspects a modification caused the failure, whether right or wrong, they'll deny warranty, and the burden of proof will be on YOU. And you'd have to sue first, and go against their corporate lawyers. The Magnuson Moss only applies if you changed wheels and BMW denies engine coverage, not something as obviously related as the above.

People who modify anything and realize he/she could be risking warranty coverage, and roll the dice, I respect. But those who think the manufacturer is the one that has to prove everything, therefore they can modify anything they want, and if something happens just put things back and nobody would notice, zero respect. The simple fact they want to put things back to stock implies they know they f***ed up, but want to get away with it . Good day gang.
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      10-03-2010, 01:50 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by elp_jc View Post
Any monkey knows altering the exhaust can mess with your A/F ratios, and THAT can affect the engine. THAT's the only proof they need. YOU would have to prove your modifications didn't alter A/F ratios in any way; good luck with that.

Finally, the reality is if a dealer/BMW suspects a modification caused the failure, whether right or wrong, they'll deny warranty, and the burden of proof will be on YOU. And you'd have to sue first, and go against their corporate lawyers. The Magnuson Moss only applies if you changed wheels and BMW denies engine coverage, not something as obviously related as the above.

People who modify anything and realize he/she could be risking warranty coverage, and roll the dice, I respect. But those who think the manufacturer is the one that has to prove everything, therefore they can modify anything they want, and if something happens just put things back and nobody would notice, zero respect. The simple fact they want to put things back to stock implies they know they f***ed up, but want to get away with it . Good day gang.
Jeeze dude, relax. I by no means said that an exhaust mod couldn't cause them to void your engine warranty. It very well could but if you're smart about it, it probably won't. All I said was that they can't just void part of your warranty without proving/have legitimate suspicion that your mod caused the damage. Which is in short exactly what you summed up.
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      10-03-2010, 03:05 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bwalshy99 View Post
All I said was that they can't just void part of your warranty without proving/have legitimate suspicion that your mod caused the damage.
Guys, if you research this thing, you will find that, in practice, this simply is not the case. The car maker is the judge in its court, and, like any judge, has the ultimate power until overturned. The manufacturer's interpretation of its warranty is whatever it wants, unless you prove it wrong. It has nothing to do with right or wrong. Believe me, the key is to do business with a dealer that will take a reasonable approach. That will not guarantee anything, but a cooperative dealer will do you more good than any lawyer.
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      10-03-2010, 09:24 PM   #14
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it may have been posted, but i spoke to a couple of guys at the dealers, they say If your car has been modded, they have to Prove that its the Modification that you did, that was at fault. ugh meaning, if i got my exhaust, and my suspension collapse, they cant blame it on the exhaust. sort of kinda thing unless they have a way to REALLY prove it then sol..
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      10-03-2010, 11:01 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by elh0102 View Post
Guys, if you research this thing, you will find that, in practice, this simply is not the case. The car maker is the judge in its court, and, like any judge, has the ultimate power until overturned. The manufacturer's interpretation of its warranty is whatever it wants, unless you prove it wrong. It has nothing to do with right or wrong. Believe me, the key is to do business with a dealer that will take a reasonable approach. That will not guarantee anything, but a cooperative dealer will do you more good than any lawyer.
Read for yourself if you don't believe me.
http://business.ftc.gov/documents/bu...l-warranty-law

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Originally Posted by MRE90M3 View Post
it may have been posted, but i spoke to a couple of guys at the dealers, they say If your car has been modded, they have to Prove that its the Modification that you did, that was at fault. ugh meaning, if i got my exhaust, and my suspension collapse, they cant blame it on the exhaust. sort of kinda thing unless they have a way to REALLY prove it then sol..
Thank you
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      10-03-2010, 11:21 PM   #16
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i dont see what the big debate is bout this warranty issue...HERE IS THE BOTTOM LINE :

if you want to modify your car in any way, shape or form, you run the risk of voiding your warranty. now if you modified your car by adding window tints to it, would this void the powertrain warranty?? the answer is it MIGHT but it probably wont because its not even remotely related. an exhaust on the other hand has a greater effect on the engine but is often not seen as a serious modification. now ecu tampering might have a much higher chance of getting your warranty void if detected since it allows the engine to perform outside factory parameters.

now here is what everyone should do :

if you DONT want to void your warranty for anything at all. DONT MOD IT!!! simple as that. modding == risk! some mods carry more risk than others so you be the judge!
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      10-04-2010, 06:57 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bwalshy99 View Post
Read for yourself if you don't believe me.
We have no disagreement on what the warranty either implies or expressly states. The problem arises when a dealer or maker chooses to take a self-serving intrepretation, placing the owner in the position of having to pursue it with a lawyer and, worst case, to litigate. That is where the time and expense arises. I agree, the owner should prevail in a case where the modification clearly had no effect on the problem. But that can be a gray area more often than folks realize.
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      10-04-2010, 08:37 AM   #18
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I emailed Joe Fabiani (President of Fabspeed) and he told me that "No manufacturer can void warranty" and to also look up 'Magnuson–Moss Warranty Act'

I didn't know about this 'Magnuson–Moss Warranty Act'. Great piece of information.

http://www.impalaclub.com/naisso/magmoss.htm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magnuso...s_Warranty_Act


Can an automotive dealership void your warranty?

Understanding the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act of 1975.

Nearly everyone has heard about someone who has taken a vehicle that has been modified with aftermarket parts to a dealer for warranty service, only to have the dealer refuse to cover the defective items. The dealer usually states that because of the aftermarket parts the warranty is void, without even attempting to determine whether the aftermarket part caused the problem.

This is illegal.

Vehicle manufacturers are not allowed to void the vehicle warranty just because aftermarket parts are on the vehicle. To better understand this problem it is best to know the differences between the two types of new car warranties and the two types of emission warranties.

When a vehicle is purchased new and the owner is protected against the faults that may occur by an expressed warranty - an offer by the manufacturer to assume the responsibility for problems with predetermined parts during a stated period of time. Beyond the expressed warranty, the vehicle manufacturer is often held responsible for further implied warranties. These state that a manufactured product should meet certain standards. However, in both cases, the mere presence of aftermarket parts doesn't void the warranty.

There are also two emission warranties (defect and performance) required under the clean air act. The defect warranty requires the manufacturer to produce a vehicle which, at the time of sale, is free of defects that would cause it to not meet the required emission levels for it's useful life as defined in the law. The performance warranty implies a vehicle must maintain certain levels of emission performance over it's useful life. If the vehicle fails to meet the performance warranty requirements, the manufacturer must make repairs at no cost to the owner, even if an aftermarket part is directly responsible for a warranty claim, the vehicle manufacturer cannot void the performance warranty. This protection is the result of a parts self - certification program developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Specialty Equipment Market Association (SEMA).

In cases where such a failed aftermarket part is responsible for a warranty claim, the vehicle manufacturer must arrange a settlement with the consumer, but by law the new - vehicle warranty is not voided.

Overall, the laws governing warranties are very clear. The only time a new vehicle warranty can be voided is if an aftermarket part has been installed and it can be proven that it is responsible for an emission warranty claim. However, a vehicle manufacturer or dealership cannot void a warranty simply because an an aftermarket equipment has been installed on a vehicle.

If a dealership denies a warranty claim and you think the claim falls under the rules explained above concerning the clean air act (such as an emission part failure), obtain a written explanation of the dealers refusal. Then follow the steps outlined in the owners manual. However, if this fails, then phone your complaint in to the EPA at (202) 233-9040 or (202) 326-9100.

If a dealer denies a warranty claim involving an implied or expressed new car warranty and you would like help, you can contact the Federal Trade Commission (FTC). The FTC works for the consumer to prevent fraudulent, deceptive and unfair business practices in the marketplace and to provide information to help consumers spot, stop and avoid them. To file a complaint, you can call toll-free, 1-877-FTC-HELP (1-877-382-4357), or use the online complaint form. The FTC enters Internet, telemarketing, and other fraud-related complaints into Consumer Sentinel, a secure, online database available to hundreds of civil and criminal law enforcement agencies worldwide.

WHAT IS THE MAGNUSON-MOSS WARRANTY ACT?

On January 4, 1975, President Ford signed into law the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act, Title 1, ..101-112, 15 U.S.C. ..2301 et seq. This act, effective July 4, 1975, is designed to "improve the adequacy of information available to consumers, prevent deception, and improve competition in the marketing of consumer products. . . ." The Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act applies only to consumer products, which are defined as "any tangible personal property which is distributed in commerce and which is normally used for personal, family, or household purposes (including any such property intended to be attached to or installed in any real property without regard to whether it is so attached or installed)." Under Section 103 of the Act, if a warrantor sells a consumer product costing more than $15 under written warranty, the writing must state the warranty in readily understandable language as determined by standards set forth by the Federal Trade Commission. There is, however, no requirement that a warranty be given nor that any product be warranted for any length of time. Thus the Act only requires that when there is a written warranty, the warrantor clearly disclose the nature of his warranty obligation prior to the sale of the product. The consumer may then compare warranty protection, thus shopping for the "best buy." To further protect the consumer from deception, the Act requires that any written warranty must be labeled as either a "full" or a "limited" warranty. Only warranties that meet the standards of the Act may be labeled as "full." One of the most important provisions of the Act prohibits a warrantor from disclaiming or modifying any implied warranty whenever any written warranty is given or service contract entered into. Implied warranties may, however, be limited in duration if the limitation is reasonable, conscionable, and set forth in clear and unmistakable language prominently displayed on the face of the warranty. A consumer damaged by breach of warranty, or noncompliance with the act, may sue in either state or federal district court. Access to federal court, however, is severely limited by the Act's provision that no claim may be brought in federal court if: (a) The amount in controversy of any individual claim is less than $25,000; (b) the amount in controversy is less than the sum or value of $50,000 computed on the basis of all claims in the suit; or (c) a class action is brought, and the number of named plaintiffs is less than 100. In light of these requirements it is likely that most suits will be brought in state court. If the consumer prevails, he is awarded costs and attorneys' fees. Nothing in the Act invalidates any right or remedy available under state law, and most suits should proceed on claims based on both the Code and the Act.

Understanding the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act

The Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act is the federal law that governs consumer product warranties. Passed by Congress in 1975, the Act requires manufacturers and sellers of consumer products to provide consumers with detailed information about warranty coverage. In addition, it affects both the rights of consumers and the obligations of warrantors under written warranties.

To understand the Act, it is useful to be aware of Congress' intentions in passing it. First, Congress wanted to ensure that consumers could get complete information about warranty terms and conditions. By providing consumers with a way of learning what warranty coverage is offered on a product before they buy, the Act gives consumers a way to know what to expect if something goes wrong, and thus helps to increase customer satisfaction.

Second, Congress wanted to ensure that consumers could compare warranty coverage before buying. By comparing, consumers can choose a product with the best combination of price, features, and warranty coverage to meet their individual needs.

Third, Congress intended to promote competition on the basis of warranty coverage. By assuring that consumers can get warranty information, the Act encourages sales promotion on the basis of warranty coverage and competition among companies to meet consumer preferences through various levels of warranty coverage.

Finally, Congress wanted to strengthen existing incentives for companies to perform their warranty obligations in a timely and thorough manner and to resolve any disputes with a minimum of delay and expense to consumers. Thus, the Act makes it easier for consumers to pursue a remedy for breach of warranty in the courts, but it also creates a framework for companies to set up procedures for resolving disputes inexpensively and informally, without litigation.

What the Magnuson-Moss Act Does Not Require

In order to understand how the Act affects you as a businessperson, it is important first to understand what the Act does not require.

First, the Act does not require any business to provide a written warranty. The Act allows businesses to determine whether to warrant their products in writing. However, once a business decides to offer a written warranty on a consumer product, it must comply with the Act.

Second, the Act does not apply to oral warranties. Only written warranties are covered.

Third, the Act does not apply to warranties on services. Only warranties on goods are covered. However, if your warranty covers both the parts provided for a repair and the workmanship in making that repair, the Act does apply to you.

Finally, the Act does not apply to warranties on products sold for resale or for commercial purposes. The Act covers only warranties on consumer products. This means that only warranties on tangible property normally used for personal, family, or household purposes are covered. (This includes property attached to or installed on real property.) Note that applicability of the Act to a particular product does not, however, depend upon how an individual buyer will use it.

The following section of this manual summarizes what the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act requires warrantors to do, what it prohibits them from doing, and how it affects warranty disputes.

What the Magnuson-Moss Act Requires

In passing the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act, Congress specified a number of requirements that warrantors must meet. Congress also directed the FTC to adopt rules to cover other requirements. The FTC adopted three Rules under the Act, the Rule on Disclosure of Written Consumer Product Warranty Terms and Conditions (the Disclosure Rule), the Rule on Pre-Sale Availability of Written Warranty Terms (the Pre-Sale Availability Rule), and the Rule on Informal Dispute Settlement Procedures (the Dispute Resolution Rule). In addition, the FTC has issued an interpretive rule that clarifies certain terms and explains some of the provisions of the Act. This section summarizes all the requirements under the Act and the Rules.

The Act and the Rules establish three basic requirements that may apply to you, either as a warrantor or a seller.

As a warrantor, you must designate, or title, your written warranty as either "full" or "limited."
As a warrantor, you must state certain specified information about the coverage of your warranty in a single, clear, and easy-to-read document.
As a warrantor or a seller, you must ensure that warranties are available where your warranted consumer products are sold so that consumers can read them before buying.

The titling requirement, established by the Act, applies to all written warranties on consumer products costing more than $10. However, the disclosure and pre-sale availability requirements, established by FTC Rules, apply to all written warranties on consumer products costing more than $15. Each of these three general requirements is explained in greater detail in the following chapters.

What the Magnuson-Moss Act Does Not Allow

There are three prohibitions under the Magnuson-Moss Act. They involve implied warranties, so-called "tie-in sales" provisions, and deceptive or misleading warranty terms.

Disclaimer or Modification of Implied Warranties

The Act prohibits anyone who offers a written warranty from disclaiming or modifying implied warranties. This means that no matter how broad or narrow your written warranty is, your customers always will receive the basic protection of the implied warranty of merchantability.

There is one permissible modification of implied warranties, however. If you offer a "limited" written warranty, the law allows you to include a provision that restricts the duration of implied warranties to the duration of your limited warranty. For example, if you offer a two-year limited warranty, you can limit implied warranties to two years. However, if you offer a "full" written warranty, you cannot limit the duration of implied warranties.

If you sell a consumer product with a written warranty from the product manufacturer, but you do not warrant the product in writing, you can disclaim your implied warranties. (These are the implied warranties under which the seller, not the manufacturer, would otherwise be responsible.) But, regardless of whether you warrant the products you sell, as a seller, you must give your customers copies of any written warranties from product manufacturers.

"Tie-In Sales" Provisions

Generally, tie-in sales provisions are not allowed. Such a provision would require a purchaser of the warranted product to buy an item or service from a particular company to use with the warranted product in order to be eligible to receive a remedy under the warranty. The following are examples of prohibited tie-in sales provisions.

In order to keep your new Plenum Brand Vacuum Cleaner warranty in effect, you must use genuine Plenum Brand Filter Bags. Failure to have scheduled maintenance performed, at your expense, by the Great American Maintenance Company, Inc., voids this warranty.

While you cannot use a tie-in sales provision, your warranty need not cover use of replacement parts, repairs, or maintenance that is inappropriate for your product. The following is an example of a permissible provision that excludes coverage of such things.

While necessary maintenance or repairs on your AudioMundo Stereo System can be performed by any company, we recommend that you use only authorized AudioMundo dealers. Improper or incorrectly performed maintenance or repair voids this warranty.

Although tie-in sales provisions generally are not allowed, you can include such a provision in your warranty if you can demonstrate to the satisfaction of the FTC that your product will not work properly without a specified item or service. If you believe that this is the case, you should contact the warranty staff of the FTC's Bureau of Consumer Protection for information on how to apply for a waiver of the tie-in sales prohibition.

Deceptive Warranty Terms

Obviously, warranties must not contain deceptive or misleading terms. You cannot offer a warranty that appears to provide coverage but, in fact, provides none. For example, a warranty covering only "moving parts" on an electronic product that has no moving parts would be deceptive and unlawful. Similarly, a warranty that promised service that the warrantor had no intention of providing or could not provide would be deceptive and unlawful.

How the Magnuson Moss Act May Affect Warranty Disputes

Two other features of the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act are also important to warrantors. First, the Act makes it easier for consumers to take an unresolved warranty problem to court. Second, it encourages companies to use a less formal, and therefore less costly, alternative to legal proceedings. Such alternatives, known as dispute resolution mechanisms, often can be used to settle warranty complaints before they reach litigation.

Consumer Lawsuits

The Act makes it easier for purchasers to sue for breach of warranty by making breach of warranty a violation of federal law, and by allowing consumers to recover court costs and reasonable attorneys' fees. This means that if you lose a lawsuit for breach of either a written or an implied warranty, you may have to pay the customer's costs for bringing the suit, including lawyer's fees.

Because of the stringent federal jurisdictional requirements under the Act, most Magnuson-Moss lawsuits are brought in state court. However, major cases involving many consumers can be brought in federal court as class action suits under the Act.

Although the consumer lawsuit provisions may have little effect on your warranty or your business, they are important to remember if you are involved in warranty disputes.

Alternatives to Consumer Lawsuits

Although the Act makes consumer lawsuits for breach of warranty easier to bring, its goal is not to promote more warranty litigation. On the contrary, the Act encourages companies to use informal dispute resolution mechanisms to settle warranty disputes with their customers. Basically, an informal dispute resolution mechanism is a system that works to resolve warranty problems that are at a stalemate. Such a mechanism may be run by an impartial third party, such as the Better Business Bureau, or by company employees whose only job is to administer the informal dispute resolution system. The impartial third party uses conciliation, mediation, or arbitration to settle warranty disputes.

The Act allows warranties to include a provision that requires customers to try to resolve warranty disputes by means of the informal dispute resolution mechanism before going to court. (This provision applies only to cases based upon the Magnuson-Moss Act.) If you include such a requirement in your warranty, your dispute resolution mechanism must meet the requirements stated in the FTC's Rule on Informal Dispute Settlement Procedures (the Dispute Resolution Rule). Briefly, the Rule requires that a mechanism must:

Be adequately funded and staffed to resolve all disputes quickly;
Be available free of charge to consumers;
Be able to settle disputes independently, without influence from the parties involved;
Follow written procedures;
Inform both parties when it receives notice of a dispute;
Gather, investigate, and organize all information necessary to decide each dispute fairly and quickly;
Provide each party an opportunity to present its side, to submit supporting materials, and to rebut points made by the other party; (the mechanism may allow oral presentations, but only if both parties agree);
Inform both parties of the decision and the reasons supporting it within 40 days of receiving notice of a dispute; Issue decisions that are not binding; either party must be free to take the dispute to court if dissatisfied with the decision (however, companies may, and often do, agree to be bound by the decision);
Keep complete records on all disputes; and
Be audited annually for compliance with the Rule.

It is clear from these standards that informal dispute resolution mechanisms under the Dispute Resolution Rule are not "informal" in the sense of being unstructured. Rather, they are informal because they do not involve the technical rules of evidence, procedure, and precedents that a court of law must use.

Currently, the FTC's staff is evaluating the Dispute Resolution Rule to determine if informal dispute resolution mechanisms can be made simpler and easier to use. To obtain more information about this review, contact the FTC's warranty staff.

As stated previously, you do not have to comply with the Dispute Resolution Rule if you do not require consumers to use a mechanism before bringing suit under the Magnuson-Moss Act. You may want to consider establishing a mechanism that will make settling warranty disputes easier, even though it may not meet the standards of the Dispute Resolution Rule.

You can view a slightly more detailed legal explanation of the Magnuson - Moss Warranty act of 1975 by clicking on the following link: http://www.pipelin e.com/~rmantis/webdoc14.htm

Sources of the above information include:

Superchips Inc. Newsletter / Car Craft September 1994 issue.
Federal Trade Commission Website.
State Bar of Texas Website (texasbarcle.com)
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      10-04-2010, 02:17 PM   #19
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^^ this act has been mentioned countless of times on almost all car forums including this one (lots of threads on the e90post side) but the bottom line is that if BMW NA says that your warranty is void, you'd probably have to spend a ton of money on litigation just to get the your warranty back. so if you dont want any risk, dont MOD!!

and something like an exhaust is clearly link to the engine so it wont be hard for the tech's to testify that your exhaust was not properly designed for the car. even my aftermarket air filter could probably void warranty since its not of the same material or have the same flow rate as stock.
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      10-04-2010, 02:51 PM   #20
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^^Great, I am now depressed again.
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      10-04-2010, 10:16 PM   #21
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people knock Dinans stuff but this is just one of the reasons i have used there stuff over the years and in addition to liking the products i have never once had a warranty issue with any of my 3 M cars over the years including this one.
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