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      07-06-2010, 09:19 PM   #45
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Oh this is concert's we've never been to? I thought it was concerts we wish never ended lol

Beethoven's 9th. No question.
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      07-07-2010, 07:44 PM   #46
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Beethoven's 9th. No question.


From wikipedia, re: the premier of the 9th -- Imagine being there, at probably the greatest moment in classical/romantic music history:

The Ninth Symphony was premiered on May 7, 1824 in the Kärntnertortheater in Vienna, along with the Consecration of the House Overture and the first three parts of the Missa Solemnis. This was the composer's first on-stage appearance in twelve years; the hall was packed. The soprano and alto parts were interpreted by two famous young singers: Henriette Sontag and Caroline Unger.

Although the performance was officially directed by Michael Umlauf, the theatre's Kapellmeister, Beethoven shared the stage with him. However, two years earlier, Umlauf had watched as the composer's attempt to conduct a dress rehearsal of his opera Fidelio ended in disaster. So this time, he instructed the singers and musicians to ignore the totally deaf Beethoven. At the beginning of every part, Beethoven, who sat by the stage, gave the tempos. He was turning the pages of his score and beating time for an orchestra he could not hear.

There are a number of anecdotes about the premiere of the Ninth. Based on the testimony of the participants, there are suggestions that it was under-rehearsed (there were only two full rehearsals) and rather scrappy in execution. On the other hand, the premiere was a great success. In any case, Beethoven was not to blame, as violinist Josef Böhm recalled: "Beethoven directed the piece himself; that is, he stood before the lectern and gesticulated furiously. At times he rose, at other times he shrank to the ground, he moved as if he wanted to play all the instruments himself and sing for the whole chorus. All the musicians minded his rhythm alone while playing".

When the audience applauded—testimonies differ over whether at the end of the scherzo or the whole symphony—Beethoven was several measures off and still conducting. Because of that, the contralto Caroline Unger walked over and turned Beethoven around to accept the audience's cheers and applause. According to one witness, "the public received the musical hero with the utmost respect and sympathy, listened to his wonderful, gigantic creations with the most absorbed attention and broke out in jubilant applause, often during sections, and repeatedly at the end of them." The whole audience acclaimed him through standing ovations five times; there were handkerchiefs in the air, hats, raised hands, so that Beethoven, who could not hear the applause, could at least see the ovation gestures. The theatre house had never seen such enthusiasm in applause. [citation needed]

At that time, it was customary that the Imperial couple be greeted with three ovations when they entered the hall. The fact that five ovations were received by a private person who was not even employed by the state, and moreover, was a musician (a class of people who had been perceived as lackeys at court), was in itself considered almost indecent. Police agents present at the concert had to break off this spontaneous explosion of ovations. Beethoven left the concert deeply moved.
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      07-07-2010, 08:27 PM   #47
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From wikipedia, re: the premier of the 9th -- Imagine being there, at probably the greatest moment in classical/romantic music history:

The Ninth Symphony was premiered on May 7, 1824 in the Kärntnertortheater in Vienna, along with the Consecration of the House Overture and the first three parts of the Missa Solemnis. This was the composer's first on-stage appearance in twelve years; the hall was packed. The soprano and alto parts were interpreted by two famous young singers: Henriette Sontag and Caroline Unger.

Although the performance was officially directed by Michael Umlauf, the theatre's Kapellmeister, Beethoven shared the stage with him. However, two years earlier, Umlauf had watched as the composer's attempt to conduct a dress rehearsal of his opera Fidelio ended in disaster. So this time, he instructed the singers and musicians to ignore the totally deaf Beethoven. At the beginning of every part, Beethoven, who sat by the stage, gave the tempos. He was turning the pages of his score and beating time for an orchestra he could not hear.

There are a number of anecdotes about the premiere of the Ninth. Based on the testimony of the participants, there are suggestions that it was under-rehearsed (there were only two full rehearsals) and rather scrappy in execution. On the other hand, the premiere was a great success. In any case, Beethoven was not to blame, as violinist Josef Böhm recalled: "Beethoven directed the piece himself; that is, he stood before the lectern and gesticulated furiously. At times he rose, at other times he shrank to the ground, he moved as if he wanted to play all the instruments himself and sing for the whole chorus. All the musicians minded his rhythm alone while playing".

When the audience applauded—testimonies differ over whether at the end of the scherzo or the whole symphony—Beethoven was several measures off and still conducting. Because of that, the contralto Caroline Unger walked over and turned Beethoven around to accept the audience's cheers and applause. According to one witness, "the public received the musical hero with the utmost respect and sympathy, listened to his wonderful, gigantic creations with the most absorbed attention and broke out in jubilant applause, often during sections, and repeatedly at the end of them." The whole audience acclaimed him through standing ovations five times; there were handkerchiefs in the air, hats, raised hands, so that Beethoven, who could not hear the applause, could at least see the ovation gestures. The theatre house had never seen such enthusiasm in applause. [citation needed]

At that time, it was customary that the Imperial couple be greeted with three ovations when they entered the hall. The fact that five ovations were received by a private person who was not even employed by the state, and moreover, was a musician (a class of people who had been perceived as lackeys at court), was in itself considered almost indecent. Police agents present at the concert had to break off this spontaneous explosion of ovations. Beethoven left the concert deeply moved.
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      07-07-2010, 10:06 PM   #48
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Beethoven going deaf is one of most tragic of tragedies. He wrote much (if not all, I'm a little rusty on my Classical composers though I will argue that Beethoven was more the first Romantic) of that 9th symphony after removing the legs from his piano so it would reverberate on the wood floor. He would put his ear to the floor to interpret the vibrations, which, along with his musical recollections (nothing I've come across ever described him as having perfect pitch), resulted in his 9th and most musically complex symphony, and I believe to be the first with 5 movements and an aria.
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      07-07-2010, 10:25 PM   #49
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Scorpions during the 80s

sad sad sad that theyre finished
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      07-07-2010, 10:30 PM   #50
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I'd choose Tesla. In fact, those guys are STILL rockin'!!

Saw them open for Def Leppard in the 80's before they hit it big. Super-nice guys too, got to meet them backstage just a few years ago. No big heads at all, just appreciate their fans and go out of the way to do sincere meet & greets after the show. In fact my wife led Jeff Keith into a backstage duet of "Signs" when she told him she loved that song! She started out just kind of BS'ing about it with him and he picked up on it with her and it got the rest of the people in the room singing along for a few phrases. It was a lifetime memorable moment...everyone in the room laughed including the band and we all had a great time with it!

Same with Jackyl, right up there in my book too, they can jam and also do the fan appreciation & autograph sessions afterwards too.

Check online for Tesla though and catch them live sometime dude, you'll definitely get your money's worth. Jeff Keith smashes vocals and Frankie Hannon can still throw down big-time on lead guitar too!
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