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      03-25-2010, 07:06 PM   #1
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Wheel Torque

Hello everyone, any one know how many Lb's or Nm for wheel nuts for 19 inch wheels. I called my SA he said about 90lb, but he had to ask 3 different people and I just want to confirm. Thanks

Hate it how the manual does not have torque spec's, my 540 had all torque specs in the manual.
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      03-25-2010, 07:08 PM   #2
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88lbs
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      03-25-2010, 07:20 PM   #3
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Dry.
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      03-25-2010, 09:43 PM   #4
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Thank you
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      03-26-2010, 05:48 PM   #5
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I've always seen 80 ft/lbs for aluminum wheels. Maybe because they're forged . Wonder if spec is the same for the cast 18 inchers. Anyway, I use 85 myself.

And one more tip: always wait at least 10 seconds after using your torque wrench for proper accuracy .
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      03-26-2010, 08:48 PM   #6
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Can someone explain please why would greasing lug nuts before torquing them would effect the torque at the end? Lug nuts tighten by threads and the grease just lubricates the thread but I don't see how it would effect the end result of torque. This is the first time I'm hearing this and really wondering why.

I have always greased lug nuts on my wheels of previous BMW's.
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      03-26-2010, 09:35 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by samma155 View Post
Can someone explain please why would greasing lug nuts before torquing them would effect the torque at the end? Lug nuts tighten by threads and the grease just lubricates the thread but I don't see how it would effect the end result of torque. This is the first time I'm hearing this and really wondering why.

I have always greased lug nuts on my wheels of previous BMW's.
It's very simple. Lubricating anything reduces friction. If you lube bolts they go in with less friction. If you try to apply dry torque specs to bolts that are lubed, you will be putting way too much torque on them and risk over-stressing them.

A torque wrench works by sensing the amount of friction applied, which is generally measured here in ft/lbs. If you apply 88 ft/lbs. to a dry bolt, and then apply 88 ft/lbs. to a wet bolt you will be putting much more stress on the wet bolt. I don't know the exact number, but it would be like torquing a lug to 110 or more ft/lbs., when the actual spec is 88.

Torque specs for lugs are always expressed as "dry" specs.
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      03-26-2010, 10:47 PM   #8
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Thanks again gentleman, great explanations
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      03-26-2010, 10:51 PM   #9
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very useful info. thanks everyone for your answers and contributing. i didn't ask the question for i got something out of it. thanks OP for asking.
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      03-29-2010, 08:10 PM   #10
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i have heard it is 88.5lb but 90 is the general consensus.

im in the market for a torque wrench so if anyone has good recommendations let me know!
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      03-29-2010, 11:22 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by samma155 View Post
I have always greased lug nuts on my wheels of previous BMW's.
You were given 2 pretty good explanations why 'wet' torque is different than 'dry' one, but nobody gave you a solution . And to amplify on the issue, if you want to 'lube' fasteners, you need to use the RIGHT kind, not 'grease'. Anti-seize paste is what you'd need.

Now, if you have a valid reason to use it, I'd do it by torquing the bolts dry, marking them at the 12 o'clock position, removing them, applying a THIN coat of anti-seize paste on THREADS only (not on the conical surface that contacts the wheel), and finally reinstalling them with the mark at the same 12 o'clock position. Unnecessary, plus too much work if you ask me, but wanted to offer a solution .
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      03-30-2010, 02:37 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by foosh View Post
It's very simple. Lubricating anything reduces friction. If you lube bolts they go in with less friction. If you try to apply dry torque specs to bolts that are lubed, you will be putting way too much torque on them and risk over-stressing them.

A torque wrench works by sensing the amount of friction applied, which is generally measured here in ft/lbs. If you apply 88 ft/lbs. to a dry bolt, and then apply 88 ft/lbs. to a wet bolt you will be putting much more stress on the wet bolt. I don't know the exact number, but it would be like torquing a lug to 110 or more ft/lbs., when the actual spec is 88.

Torque specs for lugs are always expressed as "dry" specs.
Hooly shit, thx alot dude. I always torque them 85ft/lbs WET. SO, how much should I torque if their wet?
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      11-27-2010, 04:10 PM   #13
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So, my take away from this thread would just be to put the bolts on dry. The only time I've used anti-seize compound was with centering rings (very poisonous stuff). I guess I will avoid the desire to WD-40 bolts to prevent rusting...
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      03-29-2011, 10:41 PM   #14
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So is the same torque recommended for 18" OEM wheels as well?
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      04-06-2011, 01:40 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by knifegun View Post
So is the same torque recommended for 18" OEM wheels as well?
Yes. Torque spec is generally by chassis, and not specific to a particular wheel. All the smaller BMWs are 88ft.lb. 6 Series and larger are typically 103ft.lb.
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      04-07-2011, 01:08 AM   #16
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Some misstatements here.

Dry threads are always recommended because lubed lugs would not have enough resistance to loosening, i.e. way less static and dynamic friction for the same clamping force. The clamping force is the required value from an engineering perspective.

You do not need antiseize on them either, cones nor threads. Dry, dry, dry, period. If you lubed your lugs THOROUGHLY clean them (with the wheels removed to protect the wheel finish). Use a combination of brake cleaner or acetone and pressurized air. Perhaps even a heavy pipe cleaner. Clean the female threads and the lug bolt themselves. You need to get ALL of the lubricant off. I'd also recommend swapping all of the lugs if you used the dry torque values on lubed lugs.

Lastly a torque wrench in no way senses/measures friction. It senses torque. Sure the amount of friction is a factor in the curve that represents torque vs. angle but the wrench senses torque, plain and simple. Typically a given torque produces a force at a given distance inside the wrench, that force the overcomes the adjustable/calibrated force causing the inners to slip, rotate and click.
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