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      01-02-2009, 06:00 AM   #1
Mischievous M
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Talking How to drift an M3 without...

Has anyone had a crack at drifting their ///M on a track?

I wanna learn how to drift the ///M confidently but definitely not in the manner of the "editor" who had a crack at the drifting with the pro-driver, Ben Barry.

I felt sorry for the M3 at the point of 4:20mins. First the clap of congrats, then the bush.



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      01-02-2009, 08:26 AM   #2
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Yes. I have done 6 track days in my E92 and have done a lot of drifting on all of them, such that I've gone through 3 sets of rear tyres in that time. The E92 is an easy car to drift, its setup far more neutral as stock than the E46 was so a minor dab of trailbrake is all you need to get the back going. Power oversteer not required. (obviously to maintain a long drift throttle control will be required).

My favourite settings on the car for this are:

EDC: Sport
Power: Sport
Servo: Sport

If you have never had a car sideways before however, make sure you have big open spaces. It takes a while to get used to the control required to drift a car confidently, and early attempts WILL end in disaster. The only way to learn is repeated practice or a drift course.

Believe it or not, but what happened at 4.20 is a very typical beginners mistake (looks like lift off too abruptly) and that is actually quite a tight track to learn drifting on.

Finally, don't mind any internet heroes who will come on here claiming to have been able to drift from the moment they first got in a car. Its like golf, everyone has to start shit. Its just that some people pick it up quicker than others.

Mick
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      01-02-2009, 11:12 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mickb View Post
Yes. I have done 6 track days in my E92 and have done a lot of drifting on all of them, such that I've gone through 3 sets of rear tyres in that time. The E92 is an easy car to drift, its setup far more neutral as stock than the E46 was so a minor dab of trailbrake is all you need to get the back going. Power oversteer not required. (obviously to maintain a long drift throttle control will be required).

My favourite settings on the car for this are:

EDC: Sport
Power: Sport
Servo: Sport

If you have never had a car sideways before however, make sure you have big open spaces. It takes a while to get used to the control required to drift a car confidently, and early attempts WILL end in disaster. The only way to learn is repeated practice or a drift course.

Believe it or not, but what happened at 4.20 is a very typical beginners mistake (looks like lift off too abruptly) and that is actually quite a tight track to learn drifting on.

Finally, don't mind any internet heroes who will come on here claiming to have been able to drift from the moment they first got in a car. Its like golf, everyone has to start shit. Its just that some people pick it up quicker than others.

Mick
Cheers... Thanks for the encouragement matie. I am definitely gonna try doin a lil "drift" in a huge space where there are no obstacles. I am guessing the E92 M3 is a lil more forgiving that its older brother, E46 M3.

3 sets of tires sounds like you had mad fun! hehe
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      01-02-2009, 11:34 AM   #4
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Originally Posted by Mickb View Post
Yes. I have done 6 track days in my E92 and have done a lot of drifting on all of them, such that I've gone through 3 sets of rear tyres in that time. The E92 is an easy car to drift, its setup far more neutral as stock than the E46 was so a minor dab of trailbrake is all you need to get the back going. Power oversteer not required. (obviously to maintain a long drift throttle control will be required).

My favourite settings on the car for this are:

EDC: Sport
Power: Sport
Servo: Sport

If you have never had a car sideways before however, make sure you have big open spaces. It takes a while to get used to the control required to drift a car confidently, and early attempts WILL end in disaster. The only way to learn is repeated practice or a drift course.

Believe it or not, but what happened at 4.20 is a very typical beginners mistake (looks like lift off too abruptly) and that is actually quite a tight track to learn drifting on.

Finally, don't mind any internet heroes who will come on here claiming to have been able to drift from the moment they first got in a car. Its like golf, everyone has to start shit. Its just that some people pick it up quicker than others.

Mick
Or grow up when RWD cars were still the norm and you have winter 5 months of the year like I didBut of couse I am an old guy
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      01-02-2009, 11:45 AM   #5
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Or grow up when RWD cars were still the norm and you have winter 5 months of the year like I didBut of couse I am an old guy
exactly... I learned to drift in the snow... in the snow and ice of the midwest. We didn't call it drifting back then, but we sure learned how to do it and have lots of fun in huge mall parking lots. In fact I was just doing it a couple weeks ago in my pickup truck around an icy road up in the mountains... tons of fun. Even as an old guy myself, you can never get enuf of it.
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      01-02-2009, 11:52 AM   #6
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+1 Drifting is easiest to learn in the snow. You won't be wasting tires either and can be done at slower speeds. The key is gentle throttle modulation. The Sport setting on the throttle I found too non-linear. I use Normal for the best modulation. I did a long drift New Year's eve up in NH on a nice straight. Snow is the best!
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      01-02-2009, 11:56 AM   #7
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+1 Drifting is easiest to learn in the snow. ..... I did a long drift New Year's eve up in NH on a nice straight. Snow is the best!
Really, do you reckon the snow is the easiest medium to learn on? Hmm... I would have thought that although snow's minimal friction helps, it would be harder to control.

Then again I suppose if you can control a car in the snow, then the dry and hot tarmac will be easier. just random thought!
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      01-02-2009, 11:59 AM   #8
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Me in my M3 drifting at Lelystad near Amsterdam 2 months ago, I love it. stock setup 19"wheels. Easy as hell.
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      01-02-2009, 12:03 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by Mischievous M View Post
Really, do you reckon the snow is the easiest medium to learn on? Hmm... I would have thought that although snow's minimal friction helps, it would be harder to control.

Then again I suppose if you can control a car in the snow, then the dry and hot tarmac will be easier. just random thought!
The thing is that you can do it at much slower speeds. That is key. And yes, learning car control in snow/winter conditions will help on dry tarmac, but it is a bit different, since breaking traction at 25mph and 80mph will feel different You have more room for error in snow.
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      01-02-2009, 12:05 PM   #10
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Me in my M3 drifting at Lelystad near Amsterdam 2 months ago, I love it. stock setup 19"wheels. Easy as hell.
wow... you're good man! looks like you were having fun.
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      01-02-2009, 12:31 PM   #11
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Lads

I hve done low-friction stuff too but its still no substitute for real tarmac.

For starters throttle modulation to maintain a loss of traction on dry tarmac is completely different to snow (where its easy to provoke a loss of traction).

Then controlling the snap back when/if the rear tyres do regain traction is also completely different. On a dry surface the reaction can be violent, on a low friction surface its less so.

I've been on drift days where guys move from a lubricated skid pad thinking they are drift gods, to regular tarmac where they look like complete novices.


Urbo

I saw you mentioned about sport mode before on a different thread & I have to completely disagree with you. I think sport on E92 is eactly what the default throttle map should be and I find it easy to control (I would have agreed with you on E46 though).
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      01-02-2009, 12:35 PM   #12
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Mickb, agreed....I'll do it on any surface, dry/wet roundabouts(poor Michelins....)just practice, practice, practice, trial and error.
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      01-02-2009, 12:39 PM   #13
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Lads

I hve done low-friction stuff too but its still no substitute for real tarmac.

For starters throttle modulation to maintain a loss of traction on dry tarmac is completely different to snow (where its easy to provoke a loss of traction).

Then controlling the snap back when/if the rear tyres do regain traction is also completely different. On a dry surface the reaction can be violent, on a low friction surface its less so.

I've been on drift days where guys move from a lubricated skid pad thinking they are drift gods, to regular tarmac where they look like complete novices.

).
I will question you on that driving in snow does not translate to the skills needed on pavement,but you are correct in that sliding on bare tarmac requires much improved skills to do a drift properly.If done properly it is one of the most fun things you can do on 4 wheels but at the expense of a lot of rubber!
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      01-02-2009, 12:45 PM   #14
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I will question you on that driving in snow does not translate to the skills needed on pavement,but you are correct in that sliding on bare tarmac requires much improved skills to do a drift properly.If done properly it is one of the most fun things you can do on 4 wheels but at the expense of a lot of rubber!

Gearhead there is obviously some crossover, but everything happens so much slower that I just wouldnt advise someone who had only done low friction "drifting" to try it at their next track day, because when the back end goes in 3rd gear at 60mph on a dry surface, the reactions you need to control it are completely different.
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      01-02-2009, 01:20 PM   #15
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Lads

I hve done low-friction stuff too but its still no substitute for real tarmac.

For starters throttle modulation to maintain a loss of traction on dry tarmac is completely different to snow (where its easy to provoke a loss of traction).

Then controlling the snap back when/if the rear tyres do regain traction is also completely different. On a dry surface the reaction can be violent, on a low friction surface its less so.

I've been on drift days where guys move from a lubricated skid pad thinking they are drift gods, to regular tarmac where they look like complete novices.
I don't disagree with you, which is why I did say it IS different on tarmac and higher speeds. I just said you have more room for error in snow at slower speeds. And I DO think it's a good way to learn car control in general. You cannot say it is not beneficial - it's simply not true!

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Urbo

I saw you mentioned about sport mode before on a different thread & I have to completely disagree with you. I think sport on E92 is eactly what the default throttle map should be and I find it easy to control (I would have agreed with you on E46 though).
To each his own I suppose. I don't know the E46. I just know that to me Normal feels best and most linear. Sport is grabby/jumpy up front. Sport+ is downright silly IMO. But some like that too. To each his own. I have not seen any graphs from BMW, though I would love to, but I'm just going on feel. I've always preferred a longer throttle with more room to modulate. Normal mode gives me that. Smooth is king!
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      01-02-2009, 08:08 PM   #16
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Here's one of my favorites of drifting. It's an E46 M3 though.
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      01-03-2009, 06:39 AM   #17
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Here's one of my favorites of drifting. It's an E46 M3 though.
Nice movie, we did this a lot and with my former E46 M3 as well.

The only thing to be aware of is the M limited slip diff, just like the E46 M diff , diff oil needs to get a little hot to connect which means the first 'drift' there is a hesitation of a second and BANG the diff locks up abruply, so you need to be quick(er) with the steering/throttle to avoid a spin, AFTER the first drift the diff is hot enough and the transition in locking is smooth(er) and all goes a lot easier. Even on dry tarmac.
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      01-03-2009, 11:07 AM   #18
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Here's one of my favorites of drifting. It's an E46 M3 though.
wow... off the hook!
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      01-03-2009, 11:13 AM   #19
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I love the 18" E46 wheels they stuck on the back of it since they probably destroyed the stock 19" tires in no time.
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      01-03-2009, 11:22 AM   #20
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Here's one of my favorites of drifting. It's an E46 M3 though.
this is pretty sweet too. the e30 looks more balanced for some reason. perhaps its the driver too.

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      01-03-2009, 11:44 AM   #21
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this is pretty sweet too. the e30 looks more balanced for some reason. perhaps its the driver too.

Man, drifting there looked very rednecky!
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      01-03-2009, 02:39 PM   #22
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Drifting Vids in Poland

Here is a link that I've found last year. These are pretty cool vids.
http://www.mpwr.pl/
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