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      09-13-2014, 07:18 PM   #111
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To me, Obama's plan sounded forced and half assed. You can't deal with this sort of problem half way and expect any results. You need to be all in.
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      09-13-2014, 07:50 PM   #112
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Originally Posted by Dalko43 View Post
Superior manpower is not always a deciding factor in warfare...in fact many victors in historical battles and campaigns were numerically outnumbered.

Also, communist China doesn't have any experience fighting counter-insurgency...when they encounter a guerrilla threat, they simply kill and bomb everything in sight. Unleash that kind of military doctrine in the Middle East, and we would have many more Islamic terrorist groups than what currently exists.

As well, they have absolutely no political incentive to take on that fight.

Edit: And all three of the above issues aside, China would still be incapable of fighting that kind of war in the Middle East. They have a large military force, but their force projection capabilities (ie moving an army overseas and continually sustaining it throughout combat operations) is severely lacking. So logistically they would be incapable of conducting that kind of war in that area of the world.
China's economic empire is unraveling sooner than they expected, years of economic data manipulation (most nations are guilty of the same) and a property bubble that will end like the Hindenburg Blimp is weighing heavily. The end game here I feel is war, losing face is not on the cards for China. They have 200M tones of Iron-ore sitting on their docks doing nothing, no wonder the spot price for Iron has dropped like a rock.
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      09-14-2014, 04:22 PM   #113
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Originally Posted by 128Convertibleguy View Post
+1
We should do what we can to eliminate ISIS and, short of another Iraq war for us, Obama's plan has some promise.
Inherently contradictory statement. Ground combat operations are the only way we could truly defeat ISIS in Iraq and Syria, much like we did with AlQaeda in Al Anbar Iraq in 2006-2009. If we are looking for something short of war, then we should just pull out all together and let ISIS do its thing...there isn't a whole lot of middle ground there.

Also Obama's plan is not a plan, but rather a continuation of what he's already been doing...putting small numbers of Special Ops forces in harms way (just enough to get people killed, but not enough to put a real dent into ISIS) and bombing ISIS when able. Obama's declaration that ISIS will be destroyed is laughable...you don't destroy terrorist organizations through airstrikes...it takes a ground effort which he is unwilling to commit to.

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Originally Posted by 128Convertibleguy View Post
But long term unambiguous victory in the Middle East is not in the cards, no matter who is President. Being engaged in a permanent war is a gruesome possibility. What we could use is an exit strategy. It will be interesting to see whether any of the Presidential candidates in 2016 has one.
Longterm, this problem was rearing its ugly head as soon as we left Iraq and Maliki started consolidating power in the hands of the Shia will disenfranchising the Sunni and Kurds. Obama had the ability to leverage Maliki through military and financial aid and training, but he didn't.

Longterm, this problem was exacerbated when Obama set a redline against Assad and then did nothing when it was crossed. Assad's continued war with the rebels is what allowed ISIS to grow into what it is today.

Longterm, this problem took its current form when ISIS pushed the Iraqi army out of Fallujah back in January of this year. And Obama and everyone else did nothing.

Obama, and the other international leaders, had plenty of warning and indications that this would happen in Western Iraq, but they refused to take action early on, when it could have had a decisive affect on this whole problem. This whole issue is on the verge of being a no-win situation, but that wasn't the case 7 months ago. This is what happens when countries don't have established foreign policies.

Your attempts to deflect blame from President Obama are pointless. People are increasingly aware of his lack of decision-making and foreign policy and they know what it has led to. His legacy in that area has pretty much been established, even though his term isn't even up yet. I'm not into groupthink. But I do think it's telling that Obama's foreign policy approval rating has slid below 38%.
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      09-15-2014, 12:12 AM   #114
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Obama's ISIL speech also made statements that directly contradict his own intelligence services established conclusions. He said that "ISIL is not Islamic, and no religion condones the killing of innocents, and the vast majority of ISIL's victims have been Muslim."

ISIL is absolutely Islamic - what else would they be? To paraphrase even Bill Maher - similar beliefs are held by vast numbers of muslims. Maher quoted a poll done in Egypt a few years ago - 82% said they thought stoning was an appropriate punishment for Adultery, and over 80% thought that death was the appropriate punishment for leaving the Muslim religion.

The FBI and CIA have repeatedly reported on the Muslim churches in the US that preach hatred and death to the US (until they refused to wiretap mosques...). Obama's statements are incorrect and misleading - he knows better.

He also mentioned that ISIL "threatened a religious minority with genocide" - that would be Christians, Mr. Obama - amazing that he couldn't bring himself to use the word? And btw - that threat is not in the past tense - it's still very present, and very real.

It goes on and on. Until our JV President decides to face facts, any strategy or plan he comes up with is going to be nonsense, and will endanger Americans and our allies, and innocents around the world.
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      09-18-2014, 12:54 PM   #115
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I am all for going after ISIS and getting rid of those bastards, but arming the Syrian rebels is the most ludicrous idea I have heard. None of the rebel factions in Syria are moderate. The best case scenario for stability in the region and the world as well is leaving Assad in power.

I personally don’t believe that he is as bad as western media portrays him to be, but I can guarantee that the next guys will be worse. Examples of that are democracies that we (our government) have created in Iraq and Libya. Both Iraq and Libya are a mess. It would be crazy to say that those countries were not better off with both Saddam and Gadhafi in power. Middle Eastern countries need strong authoritative figures (dictators) to rule them, democracy simply isn’t for them. I am truly surprised and thankful that Egypt was able to thwart the Muslim brotherhood and stop those extremist by implementing military rule.

By arming the Syrian rebels we are just adding fuel to the fire that no one else but USA will eventually have to deal with. ISIS is nothing but a product of the Syrian rebellion that we wanted to arm last year. Now their buddies pretending to be “moderate” will receive $500M worth of weapons and training to use against us. Way to go US government!
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      09-18-2014, 02:48 PM   #116
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+1

Not that I necessarily have a better solution short of tactical nukes. . .
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      09-18-2014, 03:23 PM   #117
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+100 on the idea that arming Syrian rebels is just nuts! They are clearly more radical than any despot that Western countries have propped up in the past. Why anyone would even consider doing that is beyond me.

The enemy of my enemy is my friend, but only until my enemy is no more.

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      09-18-2014, 05:09 PM   #118
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Originally Posted by Yugo View Post
I am all for going after ISIS and getting rid of those bastards, but arming the Syrian rebels is the most ludicrous idea I have heard. None of the rebel factions in Syria are moderate. The best case scenario for stability in the region and the world as well is leaving Assad in power.
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Originally Posted by UncleWede View Post
+1

Not that I necessarily have a better solution short of tactical nukes. . .

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Originally Posted by tony20009 View Post
+100 on the idea that arming Syrian rebels is just nuts! They are clearly more radical than any despot that Western countries have propped up in the past. Why anyone would even consider doing that is beyond me.

The enemy of my enemy is my friend, but only until my enemy is no more.

All the best.
You all miss the bigger picture of what is going on in the Middle East. The overthrow of Ghaddafi and attempted overthrow of Assad is part of a larger trend in that region where people are demanding greater liberties and better governance. There is no denying that many of the Syrian rebels, similar to many opposition groups in other countries, have an extremist/radical element to them...arming them without some sort of due process i agree is stupid...but allowing Assad to continue to butcher and murder his own citizens allows dictatorial governance to further cement its hold in that nation and in the region at large.

Bottom line, a lot of the rebels aren't good types that we should be arming, but Assad, and similar leaders in the Middle East, aren't nice types either. The more we let people like him continue to force his unconditional rule on his citizenry, the less room democracy has to grow.

Edit: Furthermore, the more we let despots, like Assad, go unchecked, the more he instigates rebellion and armed resistance...which has the tendency to serve as breeding ground for extremist and Islamic Fundamentalist ideology. If the international community does nothing to foster and support democratic movements in those areas, the only groups that will grow are the dictatorial despots and the extremist terrorists.

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Originally Posted by Yugo View Post
Examples of that are democracies that we (our government) have created in Iraq and Libya. Both Iraq and Libya are a mess. It would be crazy to say that those countries were not better off with both Saddam and Gadhafi in power.
Very hard to say in both cases...we know how things turned out since the fall of those two leaders...we can only speculate how things would be today if we had let them stay in power. Ghaddaffi did murder and oppress a lot of his people, but I agree Libya is quickly becoming a shithole.

Saddam very clearly killed upwards of 150,000 of his own, and that figure goes much higher if you include the war with Iran. As I said earlier, this is speculation, not fact, but I think that a modern day Iraq with Saddam would have been just as bad, especially if he had been around for the Arab Spring.

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Originally Posted by Yugo View Post
Middle Eastern countries need strong authoritative figures (dictators) to rule them, democracy simply isn’t for them. I am truly surprised and thankful that Egypt was able to thwart the Muslim brotherhood and stop those extremist by implementing military rule.
Middle Eastern countries have traditionally had strong authoritative figures because they never experienced true democracy, especially in the colonial era leading up to their independence. What they need and what they have had are two very different things. I think democratization is the only hope for a peaceful Middle East...democratic nations tend to fight each other less than non-democratic ones.

Last edited by Dalko43; 09-18-2014 at 05:21 PM.
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      09-30-2014, 10:02 AM   #119
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http://www.breitbart.com/Big-Peace/2...ntel-Briefings

Looks like Obama was too busy partying with JayZ and playing golf to attend the daily intel briefings? Missing almost 60% of the briefings might lead him to underestimate the threat of ISIS/ISIL. No wait - he's blaming the Intelligence community...

Next thing you know he will quit paying attention to our borders, and leave us even more vulnerable.
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      09-30-2014, 06:09 PM   #120
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bbbbmw View Post
http://www.breitbart.com/Big-Peace/2...ntel-Briefings

Looks like Obama was too busy partying with JayZ and playing golf to attend the daily intel briefings? Missing almost 60% of the briefings might lead him to underestimate the threat of ISIS/ISIL. No wait - he's blaming the Intelligence community...

Next thing you know he will quit paying attention to our borders, and leave us even more vulnerable.
"Paying attention to our borders? We have borders? Wow 57 states, and now you tell me we have borders?" -Obama
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      09-30-2014, 06:46 PM   #121
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We don't need no stinkin borders.

Or boarders for that matter
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      09-30-2014, 07:51 PM   #122
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bbbbmw View Post
http://www.breitbart.com/Big-Peace/2...ntel-Briefings

Looks like Obama was too busy partying with JayZ and playing golf to attend the daily intel briefings? Missing almost 60% of the briefings might lead him to underestimate the threat of ISIS/ISIL. No wait - he's blaming the Intelligence community...

Next thing you know he will quit paying attention to our borders, and leave us even more vulnerable.
Summary
First let me get one thing out of the way: Obama is a so-so manager at best and is more likely a poor one. No good manager publicly throws his subordinates under the bus, even if the blame rightly belongs there. Why? Because good managers don't descend into the "blame game" on matters concerning their own organization. They don't do so because there is nothing good that ever comes of it and by participating in that sort of thing they continue to keep focus on what's gone wrong rather than moving it to finding a solution. It's nothing but an unproductive waste of resources no matter who participates or to what extent they do so.

Neither that article's author, you nor I are in a position to decide what a President should read or learn via a conversation. To the the extend the author opined in that regard, he's out of line. I'm fine with folks having any opinion, but as far as the ones they state publicly, they need to contain themselves to those about which they are asked or those about which they have enough of the "minute details" that their opinion is justified, even if it's also debatable.

As an example, you'll notice that in expressing my belief that Obama is a poor manager, I stated it in terms of what he did, not in terms of what I think about his reading or hearing orally the PDB information. That he prefers to read the PDB is a fact. The information contained in it is very important is a fact. That Obama overlooked or under valued the significance of information in one or more PDBs he received is a fact. Whether oral or written delivery of that information is "all important" is not remotely certain. I noticed that not one single person interviewed for the article said a word about whether that information was presented so as to ensure that any reader would take note of the points made concerning ISIS/ISIL.

Finally, I want to make clear that I'm not a "finger pointer" and haven't been for years and I absolutely don't like that behavior. I don't want to adopt it either.

Detail
I am in a position to say that the mode of communication a manager prefers and stipulates for his subordinates absolutely affects the nature and extent of the content they present in writing, as well as how they present it. I am also certain that there are no fact-based data and analyses of the sort that contained in the PDB that cannot be as effectively communicated in writing as in person, orally.

As a manager of many people on various projects and within my firm, I expect the people who report to me to make a point of telling me when I need to pay particular attention to something they've written in their status reports or analytical summaries. Most often, they do so by clearly stating as much at the beginning of the emails they send that contain those documents, and they do that because I've expressly asked them to do it.

It's not about whether they should need to or not; it's about the fact that I'm their boss and that's the instruction I've given them. If something comes up and I am indeed under-informed, I may or may not suffer for it, but they surely will if I discover that they didn't call my attention to something significant. It's also about them doing their job, part of which is to make their boss look good, in spite of his weaknesses.

I don't know what direction, for example, Obama gave/gives his subordinates about how to function most effectively given his management approach. I also don't know to what extent his senior management team are good managers and readers of the management situation at hand. To the extent that some of them may be so-so managers, they aren't the first or only folks to attain high positions for reasons other than being excellent managers. I'm fairly certain that outstanding management skills aren't what voters think about when they choose any individual to be President, Senator, Congressman, or anything else.

I don't say any of the preceding to exculpate Obama for his management failures and weaknesses. Indeed, I agree with this writer's view of Obama's management skills: http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/20/op...anted=all&_r=0 .

I also don't care to free voters from their failure to value and consider a candidate's management ability over his political viewpoints. I wrote what I have because I know that being good at things in our time requires one to be very good at managing people and processes, and only rarely has anything to do with being uncommonly fluent with any given operational subject matter. That's so for every senior business executive, and it's even more so for top officials in the Executive Branch of the U.S. government. If voters want a high achieving presidency, they'd do two things:
  • They'd insist on learning about candidates' track record of success and management methods and styles used in achieving that success, and
  • They'd push for Presidents to be electable for ten to 12 years --- ideally for four years in term one and 6 or 8 years in term two. Given the cumbersome nature of governmental operations -- in both the legislative and executive branches -- it's almost miraculous that much of anything gets accomplished. Moreover the world has changed since the current term limits were ratified. Increased complexity requires more time to overcome the challenges one must in order to be highly effective. The current term limitations force us citizens to accept a "lowest common denominator" level of performance and prohibit us from realistically having cause to expect or demand more than that. That's no President's fault, but it is a fact and one that should be addressed in this age when voters seem to want someone closer to being a God than a man as President.
Voters consistently have done neither, so apparently good managers and effective governance isn't what they want or care about very much when they vote for elected officials.



As I said, one part of a subordinate's job is to make their boss look good. But, yes, it's a manager's job to make his people look good too. In the end, it's a team effort and the object is for each member to bring his/her strengths to the fore for the benefit of the whole, even if that means picking the ball when one's boss cannot carry it and still according the boss the spotlight.

I can't say that Obama and I have similar management approaches, and I suspect I'm a better manager than he is, partly because management consulting is what I do for a living and routinely applying the best principles of world class management is part of what I'm paid to do and be good at. Also, I can't say that any single amanagerial pproach is always the most effective one. Even as I say that Obama is a suboptimal manager, it's also conceivable to me that someone may have "dropped the ball" or failed to recognize their own obligation to compensate for their boss' weaker management style. I've certainly found myself victim to both circumstances in the past.

Hubris and apathy are common among groups in general and particularly those comprised entirely of high level managers who are accustomed to successfully doing things their own way autonomously. How many folks -- from the boardroom to the boiler room -- do you think have said to themselves, "Screw it. S/he's making a big mistake and it's not going to work if he does it that way. And when that happens, I won't be to blame."? More than you or I can count is the best answer. And yet it's apathy of that sort that is to blame.

When one sees something that's headed for failure, or problems if not outright failure, it's one's job to make sure that doesn't happen. It is a complete failure on our own part if we do anything but that. Some folks say, "I tried." I say that if you saw the train wreck coming weeks ago and the train still derailed, you didn't try hard enough.

In the example of the National Security Advisers who may think the President has undervalued the significance of something, s/he needs to contact every senior official who has direct Presidential access, if s/he can't directly get the President's ear, and plead with them to make sure the President grasps "whatever," at least to the extent that minimally the President will reach out to that Adviser to solicit more input. And that Adviser doesn't owe that to the President, s/he owes it to you and me so that, say, the coffee shop we are in doesn't blow up while we sip our latte.

I can surely hold the President accountable for being a poor manager, but I can and will hold other officials accountable too. After all, I rely on the hard work and good judgment of all of them to keep my sorry ass in one piece. IMO, they all need to be "better than the average bear," Boo Boo.

All the best.
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      09-30-2014, 07:51 PM   #123
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We don't need no stinkin borders.

Or boarders for that matter
LOL, but oh, so true.

All the best.
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      10-01-2014, 10:38 AM   #124
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I keep "harping" to my 15yo son about his one "troublesome" teacher in school. He's having a hard time following the rules she set out at the beginning. I keep telling him this is an extremely valuable lesson for him to learn: she is the boss and he has to do it her way.
We had a parent-teacher-student conference early in the year, and she told him her style, where the test questions come from, and solicited his learning style. Although he doesn't "like" her, I see her as one of his best teachers right now. She found he does best learning auditorily (is that a word) so she recommended he record himself reading his notes. That way he gets to hear himself say them the first time, and can go back and listen an nth time.

How does any of this tie in? That is the management style of his boss, and he would do well to learn it and perform in that manner.
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      10-02-2014, 12:19 PM   #125
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Originally Posted by tony20009 View Post
Summary
First let me get one thing out of the way: Obama is a so-so manager at best and is more likely a poor one. No good manager publicly throws his subordinates under the bus, even if the blame rightly belongs there. Why? Because good managers don't descend into the "blame game" on matters concerning their own organization.
Manager??? Since when is the President of the US supposed to be a manager??

He is supposed to be a leader not a manager, and though there are some overlaps in terms of duties there is ultimately one defining difference.

A leader assumes responsibility and accountability for what his subordinates do and fail to do, and that's something that this President has failed at:
-Louis Lerner pleading the 5th on IRS tax policies and IRS emails are mysteriously deleted
-Eric Holder's Justice Department handing out guns to the Mexican cartels (fast and furious)
-CIA spying on Congressional staffers researching interrogation programs
-NSA spying on a whole lot of people without authorziation
-VA chief not supervising quality control in his organization
-Secret Service head acting negligently
-Drone strikes killing US citizens on foreign soil (Yemen) without any due process or disclosure of justification

The list of 'issues' (and that's putting it politely) this presidency has encountered is astounding, and what's even more astounding is that the President hasn't accepted culpability for most of these.

The President was briefed 10 months ago (possibly earlier than that) on the potential dangers ISIS posed to Iraq and the region as a whole (you know when ISIS took Fallujah)....he didn't listen. And nor is he accepting blame, rather he is saying 'the US government underestimated ISIS.'

A real leader would have taken responsibility and said, 'I underestimated ISIS.'

Last edited by Dalko43; 10-02-2014 at 12:27 PM.
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      10-02-2014, 03:14 PM   #126
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dalko43 View Post
Manager??? Since when is the President of the US supposed to be a manager??

He is supposed to be a leader not a manager, and though there are some overlaps in terms of duties there is ultimately one defining difference.

A leader assumes responsibility and accountability for what his subordinates do and fail to do, and that's something that this President has failed at:
-Louis Lerner pleading the 5th on IRS tax policies and IRS emails are mysteriously deleted
-Eric Holder's Justice Department handing out guns to the Mexican cartels (fast and furious)
-CIA spying on Congressional staffers researching interrogation programs
-NSA spying on a whole lot of people without authorziation
-VA chief not supervising quality control in his organization
-Secret Service head acting negligently
-Drone strikes killing US citizens on foreign soil (Yemen) without any due process or disclosure of justification

The list of 'issues' (and that's putting it politely) this presidency has encountered is astounding, and what's even more astounding is that the President hasn't accepted culpability for most of these.

The President was briefed 10 months ago (possibly earlier than that) on the potential dangers ISIS posed to Iraq and the region as a whole (you know when ISIS took Fallujah)....he didn't listen. And nor is he accepting blame, rather he is saying 'the US government underestimated ISIS.'

A real leader would have taken responsibility and said, 'I underestimated ISIS.'
You forgot bombing other countries without Congressional approval, and throwing our borders wide open.
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      10-02-2014, 08:17 PM   #127
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dalko43 View Post
Manager??? Since when is the President of the US supposed to be a manager??

He is supposed to be a leader not a manager, and though there are some overlaps in terms of duties there is ultimately one defining difference.

...
Because of what you've written that I've blued,, and some thoughts you expressed elsewhere, I know there is no point in my addressing anything more with you.

I'm saying that because you have a history of redirecting my thoughts by taking them out of context, reading into them things I didn't say or intend accompanied by your putting words in my mouth, and then forcing me to defend not only my original statements, but also refute yours, rather than staying focused on the point(s) at hand.

I'm just saying that now so you understand that if/when you again quote or refer to me or thoughts I've expressed, I won't reply to you. If you are content to discuss what I've written with other people, have at it.

All the best.
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      10-02-2014, 08:20 PM   #128
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UncleWede View Post
I keep "harping" to my 15yo son about his one "troublesome" teacher in school. He's having a hard time following the rules she set out at the beginning. I keep telling him this is an extremely valuable lesson for him to learn: she is the boss and he has to do it her way.

We had a parent-teacher-student conference early in the year, and she told him her style, where the test questions come from, and solicited his learning style. Although he doesn't "like" her, I see her as one of his best teachers right now. She found he does best learning auditorily (is that a word) so she recommended he record himself reading his notes. That way he gets to hear himself say them the first time, and can go back and listen an nth time.

How does any of this tie in? That is the management style of his boss, and he would do well to learn it and perform in that manner.
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      10-09-2014, 03:07 PM   #129
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Originally Posted by tony20009 View Post
Because of what you've written that I've blued,, and some thoughts you expressed elsewhere, I know there is no point in my addressing anything more with you.

I'm saying that because you have a history of redirecting my thoughts by taking them out of context, reading into them things I didn't say or intend accompanied by your putting words in my mouth, and then forcing me to defend not only my original statements, but also refute yours, rather than staying focused on the point(s) at hand.

I'm just saying that now so you understand that if/when you again quote or refer to me or thoughts I've expressed, I won't reply to you. If you are content to discuss what I've written with other people, have at it.

All the best.
I'm not sure what I took out of context. You referred to President Obama as a manager throughout your entire, and of course overly wordy, response.

The President of the US is supposed to be a leader, not a manager. Thus, you miss the point entirely when you talk about President Obama lacking managerial skills and playing the 'blame game' with his subordinates. Not only is President Obama 'blaming' others, as you put it, for the mistakes of his administration, he is refusing to accept responsibility for the incompetent, and sometimes criminal, actions of many executive agencies that ultimately fall under his authority and command.

Anyhow, I would recommend you either develop thicker skin or just don't post replies/threads on topics that you have little experience with. This is the off-topic forum, as you pointed out in a previous thread, where we are supposed to discuss ideas and events. If you can't handle other forum members disagreeing with you (in a political section of an online forum), you probably would be better off going somewhere else....you'll save yourself a lot of heart ache.

Last edited by Dalko43; 10-09-2014 at 03:18 PM.
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      10-19-2014, 05:01 PM   #130
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Originally Posted by Dalko43 View Post
I'm not sure what I took out of context. You referred to President Obama as a manager throughout your entire, and of course overly wordy, response.

The President of the US is supposed to be a leader, not a manager. Thus, you miss the point entirely when you talk about President Obama lacking managerial skills and playing the 'blame game' with his subordinates. Not only is President Obama 'blaming' others, as you put it, for the mistakes of his administration, he is refusing to accept responsibility for the incompetent, and sometimes criminal, actions of many executive agencies that ultimately fall under his authority and command.

Anyhow, I would recommend you either develop thicker skin or just don't post replies/threads on topics that you have little experience with. This is the off-topic forum, as you pointed out in a previous thread, where we are supposed to discuss ideas and events. If you can't handle other forum members disagreeing with you (in a political section of an online forum), you probably would be better off going somewhere else....you'll save yourself a lot of heart ache.
No practical difference in the role of manager/leader. As a manager you lead people, and as a leader you manage things.
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      10-20-2014, 12:00 AM   #131
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Originally Posted by Levi View Post
No practical difference in the role of manager/leader. As a manager you lead people, and as a leader you manage things.
Spoken like a person who has never led anyone in their life.

Please go look up the definition of a manager and let me know if you still feel the same way.
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      10-26-2014, 02:25 PM   #132
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Originally Posted by Dalko43 View Post
Spoken like a person who has never led anyone in their life.

Please go look up the definition of a manager and let me know if you still feel the same way.
Yep...

Leader: "How can we get everyone working together to efficiently deal with ebola?"
Manager: "If I keep doing less than I should about ISIS, then ebola will eventually become their problem."

The US needs a leader but has an under-performing (at best) middle manager.
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