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      09-07-2009, 11:29 PM   #23
aus
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So no one knows about any issues with the Forgstars?
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Let me get this straight... You are swapping out parts designed by some of the top engineers in the world because some guys sponsored by a company told you it's "better??" But when you ask the same guy about tracking, "oh no, I have a kid now" or "I just detailed my car." or "i just got new tires."
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      09-08-2009, 01:20 PM   #24
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For pure performance, it'd be hard to argue against getting 18" Advan RS wheels with Yoko AD-08 or Bridgestone RE-11 tires
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      09-08-2009, 05:24 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by crimsone90 View Post
There are some issues with the Forgestar wheels. They machine too much from the hub and end up weakening the wheel.

Crimson how does machining end up weakening the wheel? Please explain.


Forgestar is showing the STL reports on low pads. Surpassing TUV standards

F14 WHEEL TEST DATA

STL REPORT 19x8.5 (PDF 35K)
STL REPORT 19x9.0 (PDF 35K)
STL REPORT 19x10 (PDF 35K)
STL REPORT 19x11 (PDF 35K)


One of KW's race car is running these F14 sets as well.


Quote:
Originally Posted by aus View Post
So no one knows about any issues with the Forgstars?
aus - I know of no issues. - Maybe false information from competitors of the wheel that are scared of the price point that is bring brought to the market.

Quote:
Originally Posted by kooolaid View Post
I'm not into forgestar. I prefer VMR 710 or Breyton GTS over Forgestar. Thanks though.
Hey to each his own on which style you prefer, but the quality and performance is there on the Forgestars (personally I really like the way they look). But all those are options under $3k.
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      09-08-2009, 06:01 PM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chris719 View Post
For pure performance, it'd be hard to argue against getting 18" Advan RS wheels with Yoko AD-08 or Bridgestone RE-11 tires
I'm not into performance as I don't track my car. So I wanna get 19"s. Are Advan RS 19"s affordable within my budget w/ tires?
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      09-08-2009, 06:05 PM   #27
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Garage List
2008 M3  [3.50]
2007 335i  [4.50]
2008 528i  [4.00]
2006 Infiniti - G35 ...  [4.00]
Advan RS with Nitto Invo tires
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      09-08-2009, 07:04 PM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kooolaid View Post
I'm not into performance as I don't track my car. So I wanna get 19"s. Are Advan RS 19"s affordable within my budget w/ tires?
If you're not into performance, why would you want a wheel designed/built for performance? The Advan RS is basically a race wheel, drilled for street applications. They are pricy becasue they are a proven, quality, semi-forged wheel with a race-winning hstory.
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      09-08-2009, 07:20 PM   #29
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Here's a neat little tidbit I found while searching ont he referenced SAE tst:
Are Your Wheels Safe?
Have you ever wondered if the aftermarket wheels you are putting on your rod or family car are safe? When you and/or your family take off on a trip to the local store or across the country are you confident your wheels will not fail? Here are a few things you should know.

There are no government standards or regulations that require a wheel manufacturer or importer to meet in order to sell a wheel in the US. There are several marking and dimensional requirements that are required by the DOT (Dept. Of Transportation), but no performance or testing requirements.
The standards for performance and testing are voluntary on the part of the manufacturer or importer. There are several specifications that are considered recommended practice, available from such organizations as SAE (Society of Automotive Engineers), TUV (the German regulatory agency), ISO (International Standards Organization), and JWL (Japan Light Alloy Wheel Testing Council Rules). The SAE J2530 Aftermarket Wheel Performance Requirements and Test Procedures is a new standard developed for the aftermarket wheel industry to assure that the wheels produced for use on passenger cars and light trucks are safe and reliable.
The testing requirements of J2530 are composed of 3 performance tests.
The first is a Dynamic Cornering Fatigue Test. This is a test that simulates the forces of load put on a wheel when the vehicle is turning a corner or going around a curve.
The second is a Dynamic Radial Fatigue Test. This is a test that simulates the forces of load that the wheel experiences with a tire mounted and carrying the weight of the vehicle, passengers and or cargo.
The third is an Impact Test. This is a test designed to test the effect on the wheel in the event of an impact to the wheel such as hitting a pot hole or side impact into a curb.
The quantity of wheels required to complete the testing are as follows:
Cornering Fatigue = 2 up to 7
Radial Fatigue = 2 up to 7
Impact = 2
The Cornering and Radial test sample quantities are calculated based on number of cycles and test load settings. In other words, the fewer test samples the greater number of cycles and the higher the test load or the tougher the test. In addition to the above, the tests are based on per style by size. For example, sizes 17x8 and 18x9 of the same style require a minimum of 6 test samples per size. Makes one wonder how or even if some of these “One Off” wheels are tested.
Marking requirements:
The markings that are required by DOT are as follows;
Wheel Load – this is the maximum load that the wheel is designed to carry. The wheel load is determined by taking 50% of the heaviest axel rating of the vehicle (GAWR – gross axle weight rating). Example; if your heaviest axle weight rating is 3000 lbs then your wheel load requirement would be 1500 lbs.
Wheel size (example 15x8).
Wheel manufactures name, trademark or symbol.
Date of manufacture of the wheel, indicating month and year.
Manufacturers part number or code.
Country of manufacturer.
The symbol “DOT” constituting a certification by the manufacturer of the rim that the rim complies with all applicable vehicle safety standards.
Here is a simple way to determine what a safe wheel load rating should be for your vehicle.
The first thing to do is check to see if the vehicle has the original data plaque. Normally it can be found in the door jam or door on the driver’s side.
If that isn’t available then use the following rule of thumb;
Passenger cars (not including stretch limo’s) = 1400 lbs
Pick Up trucks – bolt patterns 5x4.50” & 5x4.75” = 1600 lbs
Pick Up trucks – bolt pattern 5x5.00” = 1900 lbs
Pick Up trucks – bolt patterns 5x5.50” & 6x5.50” = 2100 lbs
Pick Up trucks – 8 lugs = 3400 lbs
In summary, unless your rod is a Trailer Queen or you only drive it to local cruises (not exceeding 40 mph or so) a few times a year, you need to make sure your wheels are safe. There are a lot of folks out there selling, building, importing and modifying wheels that when they read the above, it will be the first time they’ve heard it.
You can find the above at: http://www.performanceplustire.com/tech.info/3
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      09-09-2009, 03:37 AM   #30
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Well, since I posted my opinion previously on the Forgestar F14s, I will chime in a little bit with my experience.

I bought the wheels way back in April and got it installed in May. I'm not a 100% sure but I would like to believe that I was the first few to receive the wheels. So i went ahead with a 9 x 19 and 10 x 19 set up with ET20 offsets all around for the aggressive look. I went with the matte finish, the color and finish is soft and some people love it. But after seeing it in person, I didn't really fancy the matte black finish - ealized that matte looks a hell a lot better in pictures than in real life. The matte wheels gets so called 'lost' into the wheel well at night.. but that' just my wrong decision and it's got nothing to do with foregstars.

So I went ahead to install my stock PS2s onto it, still had some tread life on it and was planning to change it up when summer is over. The 245s fit the 9" wheel fine, the 265s was a little stretched on the 10" wheels. I went ahead to use it on a daily basis since my OEM 19s had winter tires on. First the wheel had some balancing issue which I had to go back to my workshop a couple of times to get it sorted out. Between this, I went up to NYC for two weekends (hence crappy roads) and went out to NJMP for a track session. 1 month into owing this set of wheels, I realize that the front wheel has been slightly bent (the outer barrel) and realized that this may have very well been the reason why I experienced strong vibration on my steering wheel when I travel at 70mph..

Annoyed - I just stuck my OEM 19s back on with my winters temporarily and left the F14s on the side.. I think they have a potential to be a good wheel (because they are light, looks good and come in custom offsets), but I should not have treated a cast aftermarket wheel like the OEM 19s. I realized that the OEM 19s are indeed a class above the entry level wheels out there. the OEMs are forged and light - and they withstood my daily 'so-called' abuse on the road and on the track.

This is what I thought about the forgestars.
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      09-09-2009, 07:27 AM   #31
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great write up... im sure most consumers wouldnt have a clue..

Quote:
Originally Posted by M3V8Driver View Post
Here's a neat little tidbit I found while searching ont he referenced SAE tst:
Are Your Wheels Safe?
Have you ever wondered if the aftermarket wheels you are putting on your rod or family car are safe? When you and/or your family take off on a trip to the local store or across the country are you confident your wheels will not fail? Here are a few things you should know.

There are no government standards or regulations that require a wheel manufacturer or importer to meet in order to sell a wheel in the US. There are several marking and dimensional requirements that are required by the DOT (Dept. Of Transportation), but no performance or testing requirements.
The standards for performance and testing are voluntary on the part of the manufacturer or importer. There are several specifications that are considered recommended practice, available from such organizations as SAE (Society of Automotive Engineers), TUV (the German regulatory agency), ISO (International Standards Organization), and JWL (Japan Light Alloy Wheel Testing Council Rules). The SAE J2530 Aftermarket Wheel Performance Requirements and Test Procedures is a new standard developed for the aftermarket wheel industry to assure that the wheels produced for use on passenger cars and light trucks are safe and reliable.
The testing requirements of J2530 are composed of 3 performance tests.
The first is a Dynamic Cornering Fatigue Test. This is a test that simulates the forces of load put on a wheel when the vehicle is turning a corner or going around a curve.
The second is a Dynamic Radial Fatigue Test. This is a test that simulates the forces of load that the wheel experiences with a tire mounted and carrying the weight of the vehicle, passengers and or cargo.
The third is an Impact Test. This is a test designed to test the effect on the wheel in the event of an impact to the wheel such as hitting a pot hole or side impact into a curb.
The quantity of wheels required to complete the testing are as follows:
Cornering Fatigue = 2 up to 7
Radial Fatigue = 2 up to 7
Impact = 2
The Cornering and Radial test sample quantities are calculated based on number of cycles and test load settings. In other words, the fewer test samples the greater number of cycles and the higher the test load or the tougher the test. In addition to the above, the tests are based on per style by size. For example, sizes 17x8 and 18x9 of the same style require a minimum of 6 test samples per size. Makes one wonder how or even if some of these “One Off” wheels are tested.
Marking requirements:
The markings that are required by DOT are as follows;
Wheel Load – this is the maximum load that the wheel is designed to carry. The wheel load is determined by taking 50% of the heaviest axel rating of the vehicle (GAWR – gross axle weight rating). Example; if your heaviest axle weight rating is 3000 lbs then your wheel load requirement would be 1500 lbs.
Wheel size (example 15x8).
Wheel manufactures name, trademark or symbol.
Date of manufacture of the wheel, indicating month and year.
Manufacturers part number or code.
Country of manufacturer.
The symbol “DOT” constituting a certification by the manufacturer of the rim that the rim complies with all applicable vehicle safety standards.
Here is a simple way to determine what a safe wheel load rating should be for your vehicle.
The first thing to do is check to see if the vehicle has the original data plaque. Normally it can be found in the door jam or door on the driver’s side.
If that isn’t available then use the following rule of thumb;
Passenger cars (not including stretch limo’s) = 1400 lbs
Pick Up trucks – bolt patterns 5x4.50” & 5x4.75” = 1600 lbs
Pick Up trucks – bolt pattern 5x5.00” = 1900 lbs
Pick Up trucks – bolt patterns 5x5.50” & 6x5.50” = 2100 lbs
Pick Up trucks – 8 lugs = 3400 lbs
In summary, unless your rod is a Trailer Queen or you only drive it to local cruises (not exceeding 40 mph or so) a few times a year, you need to make sure your wheels are safe. There are a lot of folks out there selling, building, importing and modifying wheels that when they read the above, it will be the first time they’ve heard it.
You can find the above at: http://www.performanceplustire.com/tech.info/3
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      09-10-2009, 01:40 AM   #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by M3V8Driver View Post
If you're not into performance, why would you want a wheel designed/built for performance? The Advan RS is basically a race wheel, drilled for street applications. They are pricy becasue they are a proven, quality, semi-forged wheel with a race-winning hstory.
Eventhough I'm not into performance, I'm spending money so I want better or equivalent quality wheels than the oems I have. And Advan RS looks really nice and seems like high quality wheels.
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      09-10-2009, 10:28 PM   #33
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Well, I think you're just looking for something unique, to set your car apart from others. The OEM wheels are actually of very high quality, and take into account weight and strength. The 18" wheels are light cast wheels by BBS and the 19" wheels are light forged wheels by Fuchs (both German companies, and Germany has some pretty tough regulations regarding wheel specs - such as the TUV). If our cars came with anything else, and the Tire Rack sold our current wheels as non-OEM, then we'd probably think they were the shiznit and buy them up
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