BMW M3 Forum (E90 E92)

BMW Garage BMW Meets Register Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read


Go Back   M3Post - BMW M3 Forum > E90/E92 M3 Technical Topics > Wheels + Tires Sponsored by The Tire Rack
  TireRack

KEEP M3POST ALIVE BY DOING YOUR TIRERACK SHOPPING FROM THIS BANNER LINK!
Post Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
      04-05-2008, 08:25 AM   #1
KevinS4
Enlisted Member
 
Drives: 2004 Audi S4 Avant
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Miami, Fl

Posts: 47
iTrader: (0)

HRE Monobloks for BMW

Here are some pictures of the Monobloks with fitment for BMW

3 STYLES AVAILABLE: P40, P41 & P43
APPLICATIONS: E92 M3, E60 5 SERIES INCL. M5 & E63 6 SERIES INCL. M6
19 X 9 & 19 X 10.5
20 X 9 & 20 X 10.5






KevinS4 is offline  
0
Reply With Quote
      04-05-2008, 09:53 AM   #2
GregW / Oregon
Commander-In-Chief
 
Drives: 2015 M4 Coupe, 2012 ML350
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Lake Oswego, OR

Posts: 7,367
iTrader: (1)

Garage List
HRE Monoblocks

Quote:
Originally Posted by KevinS4 View Post
Here are some pictures of the Monobloks with fitment for BMW

3 STYLES AVAILABLE: P40, P41 & P43
APPLICATIONS: E92 M3, E60 5 SERIES INCL. M5 & E63 6 SERIES INCL. M6
19 X 9 & 19 X 10.5
20 X 9 & 20 X 10.5
Not bad--website doesn't show 'me yet. Nice to see they are making one-piece forged.
__________________

Greg Lake Oswego, Oregon, USA
2015 M4 Coupe - Silverstone/Sakhir/CF
2012 ML350
GregW / Oregon is offline   United_States
0
Reply With Quote
      04-05-2008, 09:53 AM   #3
Nate@IND
BimmerPost Supporting Vendor

 
Nate@IND's Avatar
 
Drives: BMW
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Chicago

Posts: 10,114
iTrader: (19)

Amazing looking wheels I'm really happy HRE started making Monoblock wheels.
__________________
Nate@IND is offline  
0
Reply With Quote
      04-05-2008, 10:21 AM   #4
crimsone90
Banned
 
Drives: MR E92 M3
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Heaven

Posts: 270
iTrader: (0)

These are great designs but these wheels are machined out of a forged billet.

These wheels are not forged from a die-forged blank like MORR/NEEZ or forged from an impression die-forged like BBS/RAC. In other words, they are build using the lowest manufacturing process in the terms of quality. They take a square block of forged aluminum and completely machine the wheel out of it!

For $6,000 a set I would expect an impression die-forged wheel. I would expect top quality.
crimsone90 is offline  
0
Reply With Quote
      04-05-2008, 10:28 AM   #5
GregW / Oregon
Commander-In-Chief
 
Drives: 2015 M4 Coupe, 2012 ML350
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Lake Oswego, OR

Posts: 7,367
iTrader: (1)

Garage List
HRE Monoblocks

Quote:
Originally Posted by crimsone90 View Post
These are great designs but these wheels are machined out of a forged billet.

These wheels are not forged from a die-forged blank like MORR/NEEZ or forged from an impression die-forged like BBS/RAC. In other words, they are build using the lowest manufacturing process in the terms of quality. They take a square block of forged aluminum and completely machine the wheel out of it!

For $6,000 a set I would expect an impression die-forged wheel. I would expect top quality.
Thanks for the info--whe did you get this, though? I'll wait for RACs at ~$4k/set.
__________________

Greg Lake Oswego, Oregon, USA
2015 M4 Coupe - Silverstone/Sakhir/CF
2012 ML350
GregW / Oregon is offline   United_States
0
Reply With Quote
      04-05-2008, 10:58 AM   #6
crimsone90
Banned
 
Drives: MR E92 M3
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Heaven

Posts: 270
iTrader: (0)

Quote:
Originally Posted by GregW / Oregon View Post
Thanks for the info--whe did you get this, though? I'll wait for RACs at ~$4k/set.
When i`m not goofing around in bimmerpost I`m a mechanical engineering who is fascinated by automotive wheels construction and manufacturing processes. I've consulted to several of the largest wheel manufacturers in the US right now so I tend to know a little bit about the subject.

There are actually several wheel manufacturers that I`d put my money into but HRE and NEEZ are not one of them. They are both excessively overpriced and branding is not one of the reasons why I buy a product. I would look into RAC/Champion if my budget is between $3K-$4K or MORR if my budget is between $2K-$3K. I would also stay away from IForged.
crimsone90 is offline  
0
Reply With Quote
      04-05-2008, 11:07 AM   #7
GregW / Oregon
Commander-In-Chief
 
Drives: 2015 M4 Coupe, 2012 ML350
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Lake Oswego, OR

Posts: 7,367
iTrader: (1)

Garage List
Forged wheel companies

Quote:
Originally Posted by crimsone90 View Post
When i`m not goofing around in bimmerpost I`m a mechanical engineering who is fascinated by automotive wheels construction and manufacturing processes. I've consulted to several of the largest wheel manufacturers in the US right now so I tend to know a little bit about the subject.

There are actually several wheel manufacturers that I`d put my money into but HRE and NEEZ are not one of them. They are both excessively overpriced and branding is not one of the reasons why I buy a product. I would look into RAC/Champion if my budget is between $3K-$4K or MORR if my budget is between $2K-$3K. I would also stay away from IForged.
Thanks for the insights.

Edit: I question, though, after researching this a little more, whether any manufacturer CNCs wheels out of a solid block of alloy. Aren't all forged wheels produced from a forged blank that is the rough wheel shape? This blank may have the spokes forged as part of that process (net forged), or spokes machined later? Neither is superior; the former just wastes less material
__________________

Greg Lake Oswego, Oregon, USA
2015 M4 Coupe - Silverstone/Sakhir/CF
2012 ML350

Last edited by GregW / Oregon; 04-05-2008 at 01:19 PM.
GregW / Oregon is offline   United_States
0
Reply With Quote
      04-05-2008, 06:08 PM   #8
crimsone90
Banned
 
Drives: MR E92 M3
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Heaven

Posts: 270
iTrader: (0)

Quote:
Originally Posted by GregW / Oregon View Post
Thanks for the insights.

Edit: I question, though, after researching this a little more, whether any manufacturer CNCs wheels out of a solid block of alloy. Aren't all forged wheels produced from a forged blank that is the rough wheel shape? This blank may have the spokes forged as part of that process (net forged), or spokes machined later? Neither is superior; the former just wastes less material
There are three types of manufacturing, ALL involve CNC machining. There are wheels machined from an impressiun die-forged wheel blank, from a non-impressiun die-forged wheel blank and from a forged round block. The ones forged from a die-forged wheel blank whether impression or non-impression have very similar properties and as you mentioned the choice of manufacturing process is based on cost effectiveness. As of my experience an impression die-forged wheel cost about $100 LESS than a non-impression die-forged wheel. The non-impression will require additional material that is wasted (although recycleable) and will require additional machining time. An impression die-forged wheel requires less material and less machining, however, the high cost of the tooling will require a higher retail price. The ones forged from a round block are very inferior in quality since all the benefits of forging are virtually lost.
crimsone90 is offline  
0
Reply With Quote
      04-05-2008, 06:20 PM   #9
heezyo2o
Second Lieutenant
 
Drives: .
Join Date: May 2005
Location: so cal

Posts: 280
iTrader: (0)

Those HRE P40s look amazing on 997s, but it's just okay on the M5. A bit of lip really flatters the e60.
heezyo2o is offline  
0
Reply With Quote
      04-05-2008, 06:23 PM   #10
heezyo2o
Second Lieutenant
 
Drives: .
Join Date: May 2005
Location: so cal

Posts: 280
iTrader: (0)

HREs may be a bit overpriced, but much of the price is related to brand and design.

Crimson, how do you think Iforged, DPE and HRE compare with one another.
heezyo2o is offline  
0
Reply With Quote
      04-05-2008, 06:43 PM   #11
crimsone90
Banned
 
Drives: MR E92 M3
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Heaven

Posts: 270
iTrader: (0)

Quote:
Originally Posted by heezyo2o View Post
HREs may be a bit overpriced, but much of the price is related to brand and design.

Crimson, how do you think Iforged, DPE and HRE compare with one another.
There are several things to consider. When you mention IForged, DPE and HRE I`d assume you are referring to their 3PC line of wheels.

Three-Piece Forged Construction:

Advantages:
- High Availability of widths and offsets.
- Low cost of replacement parts for repairs
- High availability of styles/designs

Disadvantages:
- Spun-forged rim halves
- Prone to cracking and bending.
- Vibration under heavy rain.
- Air leakage due to improper sealing.
- High cost due to labor.
- Heavier than one piece.
- Higher repair cost due to labor

One-Piece Forged Construction:

Advantages:
- Higher stiffness than 3PC
- Lighter and Stronger than 3PC
- Less Prone to mechanical failure
- Lower replacement cost

Disadvantages:
- High initial manufacturing cost
- Low width/offset availability
- Limited style availability

Like I said in a previous thread, the true advantages of a 3PC were back in the 70s-80s were you could track a wheel, bent a rim half and have it replaced by the next race. Labor was low since it was done in house and the replacement parts were not that expensive as well. Nowadays, you pay $1600 for a 3PC wheel and $900 to replace a rim half. Makes no sense to me.

I would not consider or recommend a 3PC wheel to anybody since the performance advantages are almost non-existent. Is a pure cosmetic upgrade unless is a TRUE 3PC wheel like a BBS or similar. Now, if I have to choose between one of the 3 I would definetly go with either DPE or HRE. I have heard nothing but air leakage issues, vibration issues and balancing issues from IForged. Although HRE or DPE are 3PC manufacturers the fact that I do not prefer them or recommend them or see them as a performance product does not mean that their products don't have a quality superiority over IForged and they would actually stand behind their products if they ever fail. Both, however, charge an excessively high fee but I`d rather pay a little more and not worry about having to replace my brand new set of wheels because they literally suck.

BTW, If you want a true performance wheel upgrade go with a one piece wheel. People buy 3PC wheels because of the looks and not performance.
crimsone90 is offline  
0
Reply With Quote
      04-05-2008, 11:35 PM   #12
heezyo2o
Second Lieutenant
 
Drives: .
Join Date: May 2005
Location: so cal

Posts: 280
iTrader: (0)

Thanks for the insight. I'm not the type to buy a heavy wheel, but something for the street and something lightweight or even the stocks for the track would be a decent combo.

Could you also comment on Volk wheels and how the compare. Thanks again.
heezyo2o is offline  
0
Reply With Quote
      04-06-2008, 01:01 AM   #13
GregW / Oregon
Commander-In-Chief
 
Drives: 2015 M4 Coupe, 2012 ML350
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Lake Oswego, OR

Posts: 7,367
iTrader: (1)

Garage List
3-piece foreged vs. monoforged

Quote:
Originally Posted by crimsone90 View Post
BTW, If you want a true performance wheel upgrade go with a one piece wheel. People buy 3PC wheels because of the looks and not performance.
That I can agree with wholeheartedly, as long as the monoforged wheel in question is optimized for your car. RAC, and a few others, do this for some BMW models. It's like buying a made-to-measure Zegna or Armani suit, vs. off-the rack. Quite a difference.
__________________

Greg Lake Oswego, Oregon, USA
2015 M4 Coupe - Silverstone/Sakhir/CF
2012 ML350
GregW / Oregon is offline   United_States
0
Reply With Quote
      04-06-2008, 01:19 AM   #14
GregW / Oregon
Commander-In-Chief
 
Drives: 2015 M4 Coupe, 2012 ML350
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Lake Oswego, OR

Posts: 7,367
iTrader: (1)

Garage List
Quote:
Originally Posted by crimsone90 View Post
There are three types of manufacturing, ALL involve CNC machining. There are wheels machined from an impressiun die-forged wheel blank, from a non-impressiun die-forged wheel blank and from a forged round block. The ones forged from a die-forged wheel blank whether impression or non-impression have very similar properties and as you mentioned the choice of manufacturing process is based on cost effectiveness. As of my experience an impression die-forged wheel cost about $100 LESS than a non-impression die-forged wheel. The non-impression will require additional material that is wasted (although recycleable) and will require additional machining time. An impression die-forged wheel requires less material and less machining, however, the high cost of the tooling will require a higher retail price. The ones forged from a round block are very inferior in quality since all the benefits of forging are virtually lost.
HRE gets forged blanks (their designs) from APP (aerospace supplier) in SoCal and machine them in-house to their final design. http://www.aluminumprecision.com/forged-wheels.html
Now, there are two types of frorgins that APP produces, open die and closed die.

"Open Die Forgings, also known as "Hand Forgings" or "Forged Block," are manufactured in flat dies, eliminating the requirement for nonrecurring tooling. They are characterized by specific grain directions (ST - Short Traverse; LT - Long Traverse; and L - Longitudinal), and are produced in many shapes, from the classic "block" configurations to bent, stepped, or curved shapes."

"Closed Die Forging is the process whereby this deformation is confined within a shaped cavity in the dies to achieve a desired engineering configuration. Depending on such factors as complexity, tolerances, economics and performance, the dies required to produce Closed Die forgings range from complex multi-segmented PRECISION wrap dies to simple two-piece CONVENTIONAL top-and-bottom dies."

I'm not sure which method HRE uses, but I believe the latter. I am defiinitely not an HRE fan-boy, just trying to get to the bottom of the real issues here.

APP forging operation:
Attached Images
 
__________________

Greg Lake Oswego, Oregon, USA
2015 M4 Coupe - Silverstone/Sakhir/CF
2012 ML350
GregW / Oregon is offline   United_States
0
Reply With Quote
      04-06-2008, 05:21 AM   #15
heezyo2o
Second Lieutenant
 
Drives: .
Join Date: May 2005
Location: so cal

Posts: 280
iTrader: (0)

If you guys are ever in San Diego, HRE offers factory tours from time to time. Seems like it would be something that would interest you guys.
heezyo2o is offline  
0
Reply With Quote
      04-06-2008, 07:19 AM   #16
rvacha
Captain
 
rvacha's Avatar
 
Drives: '08 E92 M3
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Cleveland, OH

Posts: 745
iTrader: (0)

Garage List
2008 E92 M3  [0.00]
crimsone90-
I was under the impression that most if not all 1PC wheels are spun forged - is this not true? How can you tell if a 1PC is not spun forged? The APP web site for example indicates that theirs are spun
__________________

'03 X5 4.4i Blue/Tan
'06 E90 330Xi 6MT Sparkling Graphite/Terra
'08 E92 M3 6MT Jerez/Speed Cloth <-- Evil Twin
rvacha is offline   United_States
0
Reply With Quote
      04-06-2008, 12:29 PM   #17
GregW / Oregon
Commander-In-Chief
 
Drives: 2015 M4 Coupe, 2012 ML350
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Lake Oswego, OR

Posts: 7,367
iTrader: (1)

Garage List
Detailed forged wheel information from HRE

This is from the COO of HRE in response to information discussed on this thread:

"Everyone uses Closed Die Forging. Open Die or Hand Forging isn't accurate enough and is sort of the modern hammer and anvil. In terms of forging from a circle blank, I don't know anyone that does that as you would in fact not get much benefit from the forging process. The material has to flow and a lot of energy needs to be imparted into the material in order to change the crystalline structure. If you just pressed on something that was already near the final shape, you wouldn't gain much, but I don't really know of anyone that does this.

In terms of 1-pc, the forgings start from bar stock as well and they are close die forged into a blank and then the barrel part is spun. The is the where the forged/spun term comes from. This method of spinning the rim from a forging is actually called flow-forming. In comparison, on 3-pc rims the barrels are spun from 5 mm thick sheet, not a solid. It is almost the same process and uses the same type of machine w/ a similar end result, but w/ 1pc, you have to go back and do a final machining pass. This does allow the 1pc to be extremely precise though if done properly.

Crimsone90's post about these methods is accurate. His earlier post about HRE was not. He assumed we didn't do it the right way. I really don't know many that don't do it like this, maybe some of the cheaper guys, but not anyone that sources from APP or Japan.

There is another source where people use "rotary" forging. Basically the die isn't completely closed and it is tilted at an angle and the 2 die halves are spun relative to one another so the material is squeezed as it is compressed. Some say this is superior to APP's method in orienting the grain better which is actually incorrect because it puts a twist in the grain relative to the spokes but in all honesty, the grain direction in aluminum is not critical. The strength difference is not that high going transverse to the grain direction, but it is nice to have it aligned properly. This is why aluminum in theory is usually treated as isotropic. Once again, this method is much faster and cheaper so a lot of wheel guys use these types of forgings, but we've found the quality to be inferior so we've never found a supplier capable of meeting our minimum requirements. More marketing than practical benefit from our experience and the savings weren't worth taking a quality hit. This could simply be the quality of the company and not the process so we aren't opposed to the process as much as to the companies that supply this type of forging in the U.S. I think Rays Engineering (Volk) uses this method to good effect, but their quotes to us were actually higher than APP so not worth it as APP is already expensive compared to everyone else.

Basically the focus on manufacturing methodology shouldn't be the main concern. In the U.S. there are so few regulations that it is simply too easy to be in the wheel business. You don't have to properly engineer your wheels or meet any minimum requirements like TUV or JWL. We design our wheels to these specifications and the U.S. equivalent RECOMMENDED by SAE, but just looking at our "competitors" at SEMA makes it horrifyingly clear that most don't know what they're doing.

I told my engineer that with time he'd be able to walk through SEMA and see which wheel companies had proper engineering resources and which didn't just by looking at the product. It takes a little bit of experience, but after a while it is easy to see. Companies like BBS an Volk clearly know what they're doing and we can see it in the subtle proportions of their wheels but there are too many out there that from a distance look like an HRE, but up close it is clear they have no clue what they're doing. It is really scary for us but once again, we're in this for the long-haul so we're going to do it the right way and the hard way.

I could make all of our wheels weigh under 20 lbs, but they wouldn't hold up an M5 for more than a few months or a year or so. This isn't a big deal if you're going racing and you're going to continually inspect your wheels and throw them away after a season and you've run the life out of them, but for road wheels, they need to last the lifetime of the vehicle. A rear 1pc forged Porsche 997 TT wheel weighs 31 lbs. It isn't because the Porsche engineers don't know what they're doing!! It is because they're being safe and conservative.

In the U.S. I, too, am wary of most wheel guys, especially all the new 3pc guys, but not because of the manufacturing methodology, but by the lack of proper engineering and testing. Basically there is a company here in SoCal that will cut, box, and ship a wheel for you based on your design without an engineer ever taking a peek at the design. A lot of people are jumping into the wheel business trying to be the next HRE. We call it draw and cut. I know the designers and they're either artists or machinists. Smart guys, but not properly educated to be doing something that is such a critical item when it comes to the safety of your customers.

This is why HRE now has open house events. We want to show people that we're not like everyone else and we welcome everyone to go visit our competitors to see the difference.

Anyway, I actually agree w/ Crimsone90 on his info... just not on his HRE info."
__________________

Greg Lake Oswego, Oregon, USA
2015 M4 Coupe - Silverstone/Sakhir/CF
2012 ML350
GregW / Oregon is offline   United_States
0
Reply With Quote
      04-06-2008, 02:29 PM   #18
crimsone90
Banned
 
Drives: MR E92 M3
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Heaven

Posts: 270
iTrader: (0)

Quote:
Originally Posted by GregW / Oregon View Post
This is from the COO of HRE in response to information discussed on this thread:

"Everyone uses Closed Die Forging. Open Die or Hand Forging isn't accurate enough and is sort of the modern hammer and anvil. In terms of forging from a circle blank, I don't know anyone that does that as you would in fact not get much benefit from the forging process. The material has to flow and a lot of energy needs to be imparted into the material in order to change the crystalline structure. If you just pressed on something that was already near the final shape, you wouldn't gain much, but I don't really know of anyone that does this.

In terms of 1-pc, the forgings start from bar stock as well and they are close die forged into a blank and then the barrel part is spun. The is the where the forged/spun term comes from. This method of spinning the rim from a forging is actually called flow-forming. In comparison, on 3-pc rims the barrels are spun from 5 mm thick sheet, not a solid. It is almost the same process and uses the same type of machine w/ a similar end result, but w/ 1pc, you have to go back and do a final machining pass. This does allow the 1pc to be extremely precise though if done properly.

Crimsone90's post about these methods is accurate. His earlier post about HRE was not. He assumed we didn't do it the right way. I really don't know many that don't do it like this, maybe some of the cheaper guys, but not anyone that sources from APP or Japan.

There is another source where people use "rotary" forging. Basically the die isn't completely closed and it is tilted at an angle and the 2 die halves are spun relative to one another so the material is squeezed as it is compressed. Some say this is superior to APP's method in orienting the grain better which is actually incorrect because it puts a twist in the grain relative to the spokes but in all honesty, the grain direction in aluminum is not critical. The strength difference is not that high going transverse to the grain direction, but it is nice to have it aligned properly. This is why aluminum in theory is usually treated as isotropic. Once again, this method is much faster and cheaper so a lot of wheel guys use these types of forgings, but we've found the quality to be inferior so we've never found a supplier capable of meeting our minimum requirements. More marketing than practical benefit from our experience and the savings weren't worth taking a quality hit. This could simply be the quality of the company and not the process so we aren't opposed to the process as much as to the companies that supply this type of forging in the U.S. I think Rays Engineering (Volk) uses this method to good effect, but their quotes to us were actually higher than APP so not worth it as APP is already expensive compared to everyone else.

Basically the focus on manufacturing methodology shouldn't be the main concern. In the U.S. there are so few regulations that it is simply too easy to be in the wheel business. You don't have to properly engineer your wheels or meet any minimum requirements like TUV or JWL. We design our wheels to these specifications and the U.S. equivalent RECOMMENDED by SAE, but just looking at our "competitors" at SEMA makes it horrifyingly clear that most don't know what they're doing.

I told my engineer that with time he'd be able to walk through SEMA and see which wheel companies had proper engineering resources and which didn't just by looking at the product. It takes a little bit of experience, but after a while it is easy to see. Companies like BBS an Volk clearly know what they're doing and we can see it in the subtle proportions of their wheels but there are too many out there that from a distance look like an HRE, but up close it is clear they have no clue what they're doing. It is really scary for us but once again, we're in this for the long-haul so we're going to do it the right way and the hard way.

I could make all of our wheels weigh under 20 lbs, but they wouldn't hold up an M5 for more than a few months or a year or so. This isn't a big deal if you're going racing and you're going to continually inspect your wheels and throw them away after a season and you've run the life out of them, but for road wheels, they need to last the lifetime of the vehicle. A rear 1pc forged Porsche 997 TT wheel weighs 31 lbs. It isn't because the Porsche engineers don't know what they're doing!! It is because they're being safe and conservative.

In the U.S. I, too, am wary of most wheel guys, especially all the new 3pc guys, but not because of the manufacturing methodology, but by the lack of proper engineering and testing. Basically there is a company here in SoCal that will cut, box, and ship a wheel for you based on your design without an engineer ever taking a peek at the design. A lot of people are jumping into the wheel business trying to be the next HRE. We call it draw and cut. I know the designers and they're either artists or machinists. Smart guys, but not properly educated to be doing something that is such a critical item when it comes to the safety of your customers.

This is why HRE now has open house events. We want to show people that we're not like everyone else and we welcome everyone to go visit our competitors to see the difference.

Anyway, I actually agree w/ Crimsone90 on his info... just not on his HRE info."
I`d be very surprise if Alan wrote a direct response to my post on a Sunday afternoon but nonetheless I`m very happy we have heard a direct answer as to what manufacturing process HRE employs for their 1PC wheels.

To manufacture a TRUE 1PC wheel that is entirely forged will require a technology called 3D forging. This method will forge the wheel from every angle simultaneously and will produce a final piece that does not need to be "spun" or technically correct, flow-formed. This process guarantess the best overall quality in terms of rigidity and weight, however, it comes with a price tag of around $250,000 PER tooling, in other words, per SIZE. I only know one company that employs this method and they only manufacture road/racing motorcycle wheels, however, they are the best out there.

In conclusion, whether impression or non-impression die-forging make sure that the manufacturer of your wheels uses one of those two methods to guarantee a product that is suited for your vehicle.

Last edited by crimsone90; 09-10-2009 at 09:13 PM.
crimsone90 is offline  
0
Reply With Quote
      04-06-2008, 02:40 PM   #19
crimsone90
Banned
 
Drives: MR E92 M3
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Heaven

Posts: 270
iTrader: (0)

Quote:
Originally Posted by heezyo2o View Post
Thanks for the insight. I'm not the type to buy a heavy wheel, but something for the street and something lightweight or even the stocks for the track would be a decent combo.

Could you also comment on Volk wheels and how the compare. Thanks again.
As far as recommending a one-piece wheel you cannot go wrong with BBS, Volk, MORR or RAC. MORR and RAC are not as big as the BBS and Volk but I have not heard one bad thing in over two years that I know of them, they have decent prices and very good looking designs. As far as NEEZ goes the they are an overpriced wheel that almost nobody has so feedback from actual customers is almost non-existent and HRE Monoblok are a bit too new for me to recommend.

Quote:
Originally Posted by GregW / Oregon View Post
That I can agree with wholeheartedly, as long as the monoforged wheel in question is optimized for your car. RAC, and a few others, do this for some BMW models. It's like buying a made-to-measure Zegna or Armani suit, vs. off-the rack. Quite a difference.
MonoForged is a trademark from MORR Corporation. You mean MonoBlock as in "One-Piece". And BTW 100% agree with you.

Quote:
Originally Posted by heezyo2o View Post
If you guys are ever in San Diego, HRE offers factory tours from time to time. Seems like it would be something that would interest you guys.
I have some photos of the HRE assembling warehouse. I can post them later.

Quote:
Originally Posted by rvacha View Post
crimsone90-
I was under the impression that most if not all 1PC wheels are spun forged - is this not true? How can you tell if a 1PC is not spun forged? The APP web site for example indicates that theirs are spun
Yes, ALL 1pc wheels are flow-formed. I do not like the term "spun-forged" since it can be confused with other inferior manufacturing methods. As the COO from HRE explained spun-forged cannot be mistaken with rotary forging.

There are no true 1PC wheels for the AM that I know of. The cost per wheel is essentially the same but the tooling cost is extremely high. The quality, however, is unmatched.
crimsone90 is offline  
0
Reply With Quote
      04-06-2008, 03:20 PM   #20
GregW / Oregon
Commander-In-Chief
 
Drives: 2015 M4 Coupe, 2012 ML350
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Lake Oswego, OR

Posts: 7,367
iTrader: (1)

Garage List
HRE response

Quote:
Originally Posted by crimsone90 View Post
I`d be very surprise if Alan wrote a direct response to my post on a Sunday afternoon but nonetheless I`m very happy we have heard a direct answer as to what manufacturing process HRE employs for their 1PC wheels.
It was Sunday MORNING.
__________________

Greg Lake Oswego, Oregon, USA
2015 M4 Coupe - Silverstone/Sakhir/CF
2012 ML350
GregW / Oregon is offline   United_States
0
Reply With Quote
      04-06-2008, 05:10 PM   #21
MORRWheels
BimmerPost Supporting Vendor

 
MORRWheels's Avatar
 
Drives: BMWs
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: USA

Posts: 1,714
iTrader: (1)

Send a message via AIM to MORRWheels
Quote:
Originally Posted by GregW / Oregon View Post
It was Sunday MORNING.
That explains it
__________________

W: morrwheels.com | E: sales@morrwheels.com | O: 877.947.6677
THE INDUSTRY'S BEST KEPT SECRET
MORRWheels is offline   United_States
0
Reply With Quote
      04-06-2008, 06:10 PM   #22
rvacha
Captain
 
rvacha's Avatar
 
Drives: '08 E92 M3
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Cleveland, OH

Posts: 745
iTrader: (0)

Garage List
2008 E92 M3  [0.00]
Quote:
Originally Posted by crimsone90 View Post
Yes, ALL 1pc wheels are flow-formed. I do not like the term "spun-forged" since it can be confused with other inferior manufacturing methods. As the COO from HRE explained spun-forged cannot be mistaken with rotary forging.

There are no true 1PC wheels for the AM that I know of. The cost per wheel is essentially the same but the tooling cost is extremely high. The quality, however, is unmatched.
I am not trying to be a pain, I just want to make sure I understand this correctly. In your 3PC list you have stated that one of the disadvantages was "Spun-forged rim halves" It is not the spun forged/flow formed part you take objection to, it's the halves?

BTW your posts have been a great help and I highly appreciate your efforts!
__________________

'03 X5 4.4i Blue/Tan
'06 E90 330Xi 6MT Sparkling Graphite/Terra
'08 E92 M3 6MT Jerez/Speed Cloth <-- Evil Twin
rvacha is offline   United_States
0
Reply With Quote
Post Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:38 PM.




m3post
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.0
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
1Addicts.com, BIMMERPOST.com, E90Post.com, F30Post.com, M3Post.com, ZPost.com, 5Post.com, 6Post.com, 7Post.com, XBimmers.com logo and trademark are properties of BIMMERPOST