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      12-19-2012, 07:42 PM   #23
M3PO
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Oh boy, I am a big DIY guy but wheel bearings are something that I will pay someone to do. It's a bitch of a job and it's easy to ruin the new bearings if you do it wrong. GL!
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      12-21-2012, 12:10 PM   #24
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You mean that all that time I spent watching Wheeler Dealer has been a waste? The reason I'd like to try this one is that there is a pretty decent DIY available for an earlier model 3 series. See
. I really like the fact that the guy does it with no special (read: expensive) tools. What could possibly go wrong?

Seriously, I've done a lot of DIY jobs before--including some pretty substantial ones. So I guess my question is this: does anybody know the differences between an early model 3 series and an e92 M3?

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Oh boy, I am a big DIY guy but wheel bearings are something that I will pay someone to do. It's a bitch of a job and it's easy to ruin the new bearings if you do it wrong. GL!
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      12-21-2012, 04:36 PM   #25
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I did this on an E30, similar to the E36 (edit: that was an E46) you posted. He doesn't go over pushing the axle out of the hub. That can be a bitch and you can ruin the axle. You usually need a special tool to do that unless you get lucky and the splines are loose enough that you can get it out with a drift. That bearing seperator is a special tool (I wish I had one when I did mine). Installing the new one (next video, I didn't watch it) is the hard part. But yes, removing and installing the bearing can be done with washers, big bolts, and short pipe nipples.

I don't know the exact differences between the video and the E92 regarding the bearing installation procedure. But the parts concerned with the bearing (hub, bearing, axle, etc) should be virtually the same. The differences will be with regards to what you have to remove to get to it because the suspension setup on the E92 is a link setup which is much different than the older trailing arm based rear suspensions.

GL and please consider making a DIY since this seems to be an increasingly common issue.

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Originally Posted by SP33DRCR View Post
You mean that all that time I spent watching Wheeler Dealer has been a waste? The reason I'd like to try this one is that there is a pretty decent DIY available for an earlier model 3 series. See
. I really like the fact that the guy does it with no special (read: expensive) tools. What could possibly go wrong?

Seriously, I've done a lot of DIY jobs before--including some pretty substantial ones. So I guess my question is this: does anybody know the differences between an early model 3 series and an e92 M3?
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      01-14-2013, 11:12 AM   #26
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Hey, so I did the job myself and fixed all problems. I was unable to do a DIY, but I did learn and confirm quite a bit.

As a refresher, I drive an 2009 e92 M3, and a few months back, I had three warning lights come on the iDrive screen:

1. Braking/Chassis stablization malfunction!
2. DBC malfunction! Drive carefully
3. Start-off assistance inactive!

Additionally, the cruise control would not work and I was getting the yellow ABS, Brake and triangle with the arrow encircling it, and the ((ABS)) warning.

The car drove normally. I didn't notice any noise. I took it to Dinan, and after a relatively expensive diagnosis, they told me that I a left wheel bearing assembly was defective.

I first tried replacing the sensors, and cleaning out where the attach to the hub. It was a cheap and easy job--but it was not the problem.

So I ordered bearings from a site called partsgeek.com. They were about $90 per wheel, and new axle nuts (about $9). I also went to Harbor Freight Tools and purchased a bearing separator (about $20) and Front Wheel Bearing Adapter kit (about $100). And after a lot of trial and error (and maybe a little cussing), I replaced both bearings.

I got into the car, and took it for a test drive. Everything was great with the ride, but all of the same lights came on--and more. The word "Brake" turned red, and the Airbag light came on, and I had no speedometer.

I ended up purchasing a second set of bearings from BMW (about $140 each), and interestingly they looked identical to the Timkens I purchased previously. Turns out that the first set I purchased were boxed incorrectly (or??) because they did not have the magnetic sensors. I put in the BMW bearings, and drove the car--and everything is back to normal. All lights out, and speedo and cruise control work again.

So this is what my experience suggests.

1. If you get the three lights, you need to replace a rear wheel bearing.
2. If, in addition to the three lights, your speedo doesn't work--its your right rear wheel bearing that is bad.
3. If, in addition to the three lights, your cruise control doesn't work--is your left wheel bearing that is bad.
4. If, in addition to the three lights, you have no speedo, no cruise control and your Airbag lights come on, then both rear bearings need to be replaced.
5. Although special tools are needed to do this job, it is possible to do as a DIY. The special tools you will need cost $120, and are pretty readily available. It can be pretty physical, but it is not all that complicated.
6. Although replacing the sensors is easy, they are probably not the problem. And no, cleaning them out will not fix the problem.
7. The system will reset itself when it gets a consistent signal from both wheel sensors.

When I get a chance, I'll see if I can do a walk-through from memory.
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      01-14-2013, 06:44 PM   #27
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Thanks for the follow up! Way to go! Did the axles come out easily for you? Did you disconnect any arms, remove the spring or unbolt the shock?

Quote:
Originally Posted by SP33DRCR View Post
Hey, so I did the job myself and fixed all problems. I was unable to do a DIY, but I did learn and confirm quite a bit.

As a refresher, I drive an 2009 e92 M3, and a few months back, I had three warning lights come on the iDrive screen:

1. Braking/Chassis stablization malfunction!
2. DBC malfunction! Drive carefully
3. Start-off assistance inactive!

Additionally, the cruise control would not work and I was getting the yellow ABS, Brake and triangle with the arrow encircling it, and the ((ABS)) warning.

The car drove normally. I didn't notice any noise. I took it to Dinan, and after a relatively expensive diagnosis, they told me that I a left wheel bearing assembly was defective.

I first tried replacing the sensors, and cleaning out where the attach to the hub. It was a cheap and easy job--but it was not the problem.

So I ordered bearings from a site called partsgeek.com. They were about $90 per wheel, and new axle nuts (about $9). I also went to Harbor Freight Tools and purchased a bearing separator (about $20) and Front Wheel Bearing Adapter kit (about $100). And after a lot of trial and error (and maybe a little cussing), I replaced both bearings.

I got into the car, and took it for a test drive. Everything was great with the ride, but all of the same lights came on--and more. The word "Brake" turned red, and the Airbag light came on, and I had no speedometer.

I ended up purchasing a second set of bearings from BMW (about $140 each), and interestingly they looked identical to the Timkens I purchased previously. Turns out that the first set I purchased were boxed incorrectly (or??) because they did not have the magnetic sensors. I put in the BMW bearings, and drove the car--and everything is back to normal. All lights out, and speedo and cruise control work again.

So this is what my experience suggests.

1. If you get the three lights, you need to replace a rear wheel bearing.
2. If, in addition to the three lights, your speedo doesn't work--its your right rear wheel bearing that is bad.
3. If, in addition to the three lights, your cruise control doesn't work--is your left wheel bearing that is bad.
4. If, in addition to the three lights, you have no speedo, no cruise control and your Airbag lights come on, then both rear bearings need to be replaced.
5. Although special tools are needed to do this job, it is possible to do as a DIY. The special tools you will need cost $120, and are pretty readily available. It can be pretty physical, but it is not all that complicated.
6. Although replacing the sensors is easy, they are probably not the problem. And no, cleaning them out will not fix the problem.
7. The system will reset itself when it gets a consistent signal from both wheel sensors.

When I get a chance, I'll see if I can do a walk-through from memory.
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      01-16-2013, 10:18 AM   #28
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One more important lesson is that the bearings need to go in a certain way. The speed sensor is imbedded in the bearing behind the dust shield. Although you can't see it, it is magnetic. Use a small metalic object, like a paperclip. And be wary, the first set of bearings I purchased did NOT have any speed sensors.
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      01-16-2013, 10:36 AM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by M3PO View Post
Thanks for the follow up! Way to go! Did the axles come out easily for you? Did you disconnect any arms, remove the spring or unbolt the shock?
I didn't have any real trouble with anything. I used the Harbor Freight Tools bearing splitter (about $20) and was able to remove the hub from the axle. With my electric impact wrench, it was actually very easy/fast. Putting the axles back in the hub was more difficult though. I'll explain why below.

To remove the bearing (after the hub was out), I removed the upper suspension components. There are two aluminum suspension struts and the sway bar. I was able to flop the outer hub assembly out, and pull out the axle and set it aside. I then reinstalled the two upper aluminum suspension struts, and used the Harbor Freight Tools "Front Wheel Bearing Adapter" kit to remove and then reinstall. It was quite physical, and a very big crescent wrench is helpful. But the old one came out and the new one went in without too much trouble.

I was able to reinstall the central hub with the same tool, and it was also quite easy. The hard part is reinstalling the axle into the central hub. There is really no way to pull it in, and it would not go in far enough for the axle nut to have any threads to grab. So I ended up removing the axle from the diff, and removing all of the suspension components from the outer hub, and removing the whole assembly from the car. Sounds like a lot--but it actually comes out quite quickly, especially if you have an impact wrench. I then "pressed" the central hub by putting a 2x4 on the ground and pile driving the central hub onto the axle. A few knocks are enough to get the axle threads through, and then I draw it on the rest of the way with the axle nut and my trusty impact wrench.

Installing the whole axle/hub assembly can be tricky. I installed two of the upper aluminum struts to the hub, and then use really long extensions on my ratchet (acutually several of them) to get the axle mounted to the diff. Six bolts. (Note, I leave the heat shield off during this--though you'll need to Dremmel it so it can be installed with the central hub on.) If you leave the suspension connectors finger tight, putting everything back together is easier. Sometimes it is helpful to use a floor jack under the hub to get things to line up. Be careful with crossthreading the bolts for the aluminum struts.

I was able to do the entire job (one wheel) in about 3 hours.
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      01-16-2013, 11:03 AM   #30
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Also it is important to never touch the magnetic side of the bearings with a magnet. They will damage the sensor wheel on the bearing and render it useless. As others stated touch a paper clip or small/light weight object to the side of the bearing to see which side is magnetic. That side goes on the inside.
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      01-16-2013, 11:32 AM   #31
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A few more tricks I learned...

In using the splitter to remove the central hub, you are basically using the lug threads to push against the splitter. Though you can use the lug bolts, they will be too short. So I used the bolt from one of the aluminum suspension struts (the rear/bottom one, which is easy to remove) and the shock lower bolt. I actually removed both rear/bottom aluminum suspension struts, since they are pretty easy to remove/install. They are long enough. Using my electic impact wrench made it fast--just a short burst, keeping it even, and the central hub comes out straight away.

If you remove the lower sway bar connector (it is connected to the outer hub assembly), make sure you put it back on before you pile drive the axle into the central hub. The bolt is too long to install it after the axle is in. But, if you forget, just Dremmel about 1/4 inch off the end of the bolt and you'll be fine. It'll barely fit.

I ended up buying a tap and die kit, and I cleaned out (rust and junk) from all of the threads on the outer hub assembly. Some bolts are going out/in several times, and having clean threads makes it easier.

When muscling out the bearing (and muscling it back in), put the floor jack underneath the outer hub assembly to keep it from moving around too much. To get the bearing out, I basically had to stand on the big crescent wrench.

And finally, remember to install the retaining clip immediately after the bearing is installed into the outer housing (also, don't forget to take out the retaining clip when removing the bearing). If you forget, you basically have to tear everything apart.
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