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      09-30-2011, 02:31 AM   #45
swamp2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MuttGrunt View Post
It's not very often I have to say this so bluntly:
You obviously don't know what the hell you're talking about.
...
(blah, blah, blah)
No reason to have a hissy fit. Take a deep breath.

All I said was the pictures you showed APPEAR to shiny for my PERSONAL taste for OEM BMW leather. That says not one word about my knowledge of Ferrari's not anything else you went off about. My experience with Leather Master was not good at all. Very little cleaning power and left things too shiny for my taste.

Care to take a survey and see if folks who prefer an OEM BMW APPEARANCE for their leather also find your sacred Ferrari pictures way too shiny? I wouldn't hold your breath waiting for your validation on such a survey.

Your contention that a magic eraser on leather is more or less equivalent to a sanding disk used to wash a car remains the ultimate in extreme hyperbole. No if's and's or butt's. Your refusal to accept some middle ground about the very low level of abrasion of a magic eraser leads to the obvious conclusion that you have never tried one, on any material, leather or not. Nothing substitutes for some actual hands on experience as you can certainly attest to in your line of work.

I have also heard of "evidence" (alluded to in my other debate on this topic that I linked to above) of severe and unrecoverable damage to leather from a magic eraser. I still have seen no proof of that either but I do believe that with extremely harsh and repeated use of this product you may cause some damage.

The reason that people keep posting about it is really quite simple. It does work, it works wonders and does not appear to cause any immediate damage. There have been enough posts with more or less the same conclusion that it takes no great leap of faith to accept this. Will I personallu continue to use these as daily/weekly/month leather care product, no. Will I infrequently and GENTLY use them for the most stubborn, shiny and dirty parts of my leather, yes I will.

Closing with a nice pompous close as you did...

Fellow members of M3post.com. The king of the world Mutt has spoken. Lay down and worship at his feet....

Or perhaps not. Take the advise here or leave it, give it a try, maybe only once if you are conservative. It will work wonders on badly stained, dirty and shiny leather especially steering wheels. On second thought no, don't do that. I am only here to provide poor advise on purpose and ruin your leather immediately with a product that feels about as abrasive as a line dried wash cloth...

No more to add.
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      09-30-2011, 09:54 AM   #46
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The biggest issue here is someone spreading bad and detrimental information to other car enthusiast. Like a product I didn't list? No problem. Want to try something else? No issue. Want to even debate using an oil based / solvent based product (Leatherique) on a urethane coating? Understandable.

You're debating on whether of not it's not only OK to us a Magic Eraser, but that it's a good thing to use to maintain your leather? NOT OK.

You assert that because I don't support your detrimental use of a product, that it
Quote:
Originally Posted by swamp2
leads to the obvious conclusion that you have never tried one, on any material, leather or not
which is wrong, but more importantly is completely irrelevant. I continue to use Magic Erasers and have given advice to use them on things like plastic trim for things like scuff removal and wax residue. They work WONDERS on such tough homogeneous material like plastic trim. There's no top-coat to worry about, and any additional properties (such as UV ray protection) are impregnated through-out the material, not just on the outer surface).


Even worse than claiming I'm not familiar with the house-hold cleaning tool you champion as not only an acceptable, but the best method for maintaining leather, you state this:
Quote:
Originally Posted by swamp2
Your contention that a magic eraser on leather is more or less equivalent to a sanding disk used to wash a car remains the ultimate in extreme hyperbole.
I suppose you either don't want to miss another opportunity to prove that you don't know what the hell you're talking about, especially after Mike made this post on page two:

Quote:
Originally Posted by mikenap View Post
Just thought I'd throw this out there. Richy H from one of the detailing forums has used a magic eraser on paint defects before, and says it leaves scratches comparable to 3000 grit sandpaper. So if anyone doesn't have a magic eraser on hand, now you have another leather cleaning option.
Surely looks like a case of extreme hyperbole to me!
For what it's worth, the "Richy" Mike refers to is a well known guy from Ontario BTW, for those that actually enjoy research and learning, rather than plugging their ears and stomping about while spreading detrimental detailing tips to others.


If you were just mislead and hadn't understood the negative affects, it'd be one thing. We all start somewhere. No one naturally says "I think I should use high quality microfiber towels, Grit Guards, and two buckets to wash my car" when they start out. It's much worse than that. You actually already know that this isn't recommended or advised.
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Originally Posted by swamp2
I have also heard of "evidence" (alluded to in my other debate on this topic that I linked to above) of severe and unrecoverable damage to leather from a magic eraser. I still have seen no proof of that either but I do believe that with extremely harsh and repeated use of this product you may cause some damage.I have also heard of "evidence" (alluded to in my other debate on this topic that I linked to above) of severe and unrecoverable damage to leather from a magic eraser. I still have seen no proof of that either but I do believe that with extremely harsh and repeated use of this product you may cause some damage.
No instant proof? Magic Erasers don't completely ruin leather in one sitting? Well I'll be darned...you must be right then. I haven't ruined a BMW's paint by polishing through it yet, so I suppose there's no threat in polishing a car either!
BP Oil spill? Those environmentalists CLAIM it's not good, but I haven't seen any issues myself yet, so I'm sure they're wrong.

Besides, if Magic Eraser shouldn't be used on leather, they'd list it on the package! No one will ever sell you something that won't work, or that is bad for you.




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      09-30-2011, 10:23 AM   #47
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I've been using Leatherique and my leather isn't "shiny" in appearance. It's still looks pretty OEM to me.

I don't know nearly as much about car detailing and care as you guys do, but based on Mutt's experience I'd have to side with him. I've seen him posting in here for a while and I think he really knows what he's talking about. I'm sure using the Magic Eraser ONCE or TWICE wouldn't really do much damage (at least noticeable damage), but consistent use will probably wreak havoc.

Overall, I don't understand why you are so persistent in your defense of the ME? Is it price? The results? I mean you could probably get similar results with a light cleaner and a microfiber towel. I've used a few products and have not seen this "shine" you're referring to, so I don't know how that is universal across the board...

I don't mean to get in the middle of your debate though
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      09-30-2011, 01:24 PM   #48
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OK guess I am not quite done...

Quote:
Originally Posted by MuttGrunt View Post
The biggest issue here is someone spreading bad and detrimental information to other car enthusiast.
I've always qualified my "advise" if you can even call it that with appropriate qualifiers admitting the mild abrasion and saying do not use it regularly.

What I will not back down from is that for very badly oiled, shiny and dirty leather. If you can not get any of the other top of the line, expensive products to work, this one will and it works wonders. Any minor, likely invisible damage is the topic you are obssessing about and has been addressed.


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You're debating on whether of not it's not only OK to us a Magic Eraser, but that it's a good thing to use to maintain your leather? NOT OK.
Your opinion. I'm entitled to mine. Again with all appropriate qualifiers I have stated. Similarly, is a light polish by a qualified detailer OK for very light haze, atrifacts or swirl. Yes, absolutely. It is OK to polish your car every time you wash it, NO. Or even this: Despite the best of products and tools and a 2 bucket method, abrasive particles WILL be in your washing cloth/sponge etc. Thus the very process of washing your car is abrasive. Does this mean don't wash? Of course it doesn't. It means take all precautions you can and accepting that it is a matter of scale.

Washing your car damages its finish, period. Scale buddy, scale. The same point I am trying to make here.


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Originally Posted by MuttGrunt View Post
Even worse than claiming I'm not familiar with the house-hold cleaning tool you champion as not only an acceptable, but the best method for maintaining leather, you state this:
Absolutely never, nowhere did I conclude that ME is "the best method for maintaining leather". That is 100% fabrication. I've always stated careful qualifiers. STOP with this BS.

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Originally Posted by mikenap View Post
Just thought I'd throw this out there. Richy H from one of the detailing forums has used a magic eraser on paint defects before, and says it leaves scratches comparable to 3000 grit sandpaper. So if anyone doesn't have a magic eraser on hand, now you have another leather cleaning option.
1. OK someone said it, it must be true.
2. Yes or no: Soft surfaces respond fundamentally differently to abrasives compared to hard surfaces (such as pain/clear coat).
3. Yes or no: Any rubbing of any product on another is fundamentally abrasive.

Have I mentioned the word "scale"...

No matter how much you try, you simply can not deny the facts that these things can work wonders. It is an entirely separate issue as to how much damage they may be causing and whether or not folks can get some great results in difficult situations with gentle, selective and infrequent use where other products have failed.

Keep going, despite getting pretty bored with this, I suppose I can continue.
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      09-30-2011, 01:48 PM   #49
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Originally Posted by swamp2 View Post



1. OK someone said it, it must be true.
2. Yes or no: Soft surfaces respond fundamentally differently to abrasives compared to hard surfaces (such as pain/clear coat).
3. Yes or no: Any rubbing of any product on another is fundamentally abrasive.
1. Wow, if this is your argument, how is it any different than your assertion that it works and is safe to use? Mutt has pics to back up his work, Richy has pics to back up his work and you have.......nothing.
2. Soft surfaces respond differently to abrasives, yes. Generally, worse. What was the point here?
3. The problem isn't who is right or who is wrong. Not whose method works better. It's that your suggestion MAY be taken by someone who then proceeds to ruin his car's interior. Are you going to step up when that happens, since they did it on your authority? The entire detailing community has embraced the "least aggressive" method, whether on paint, wheels, leather, whatever. No way, no how is something functionally as abrasive as 3000 grit sandpaper the best way to go about this.
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      09-30-2011, 01:52 PM   #50
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Templar View Post
Overall, I don't understand why you are so persistent in your defense of the ME? Is it price? The results? I mean you could probably get similar results with a light cleaner and a microfiber towel. I've used a few products and have not seen this "shine" you're referring to, so I don't know how that is universal across the board...

I don't mean to get in the middle of your debate though
No worries. Join the debate/discussion. The reason I am engaging here is because on my Fox Red leather, especially seat bottoms and steering wheel, despite using some of the "best" products out there. I could not get rid of the shine and discoloration nor get anywhere close to the very nice matte OEM factory new finish. The ME quickly and easily did this. The results in my opinion were truly amazing. I do realize the product is very mildly abrasive, but EVERYTHING is abrasive, even washing your car. My "advise" (experience is a better term) along with qualifiers to those concerned about the most minute "damage" to their leather has been fully stated and clarified. The dogmatism of some professionals is frustrating for those looking for a real world approach.

This picture helps my point. Even soft human tissue or soft soled shoes can be very abrasive. It is a matter of scale (physical scales and time scales).
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      09-30-2011, 02:02 PM   #51
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1. Wow, if this is your argument, how is it any different than your assertion that it works and is safe to use? Mutt has pics to back up his work, Richy has pics to back up his work and you have.......nothing.
And like I said most products produce results way too shiny for me and for many, whereas many strongly prefer a very matte finish.

I've yet to see pictures of leather ruined by ME.

I will snap some pictures of my next results using ME. I think based on the number of folks who have claimed success (IIRC Mutt said someone posts every month or so on this) it isn't reasonable to say flat out that the product does not work. Again how well it works may be bolstered by some pictures. Either way, there is absolutely no reason for me to lie about this.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mikenap View Post
2. Soft surfaces respond differently to abrasives, yes. Generally, worse. What was the point here?
Abrasives on paint or a clear coat both due to their shiny nature and hardness is very different than how flesh/skin (i.e. leather) will respond to a very fine abrasive.

Don't forget the other "magic" part of the ME is its micropore structure which is very effective at not only removing grime but also TRAPPING it. This has not been emphasized much thus far but is a very important part of how and why this product works. It is far more than just a fine abrasive. It makes it better for cases like "dirty" leather where there is an actual buildup (skin cells, body oil, dirt, food, etc.). Again this is very different than what you want to accomplish with a clear coat polish on your exterior finish.

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Originally Posted by mikenap View Post
3. The problem isn't who is right or who is wrong. Not whose method works better. It's that your suggestion MAY be taken by someone who then proceeds to ruin his car's interior. Are you going to step up when that happens, since they did it on your authority? The entire detailing community has embraced the "least aggressive" method, whether on paint, wheels, leather, whatever. No way, no how is something functionally as abrasive as 3000 grit sandpaper the best way to go about this.
I do appreciate and embrace the "least aggressive principal" IN GENERAL. Nothing wrong with that advise. For the tenth time... I stand by my experience and advise on very careful and infrequent use of this product where specific goals are in mind. The analogy to a careful polish is appropriate. Isn't is actually a bit absurd on the interwebs to ask (a non professional enthusiast) to take responsibility for someone else's failure?
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      09-30-2011, 02:26 PM   #52
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I do appreciate and embrace the "least aggressive principal" IN GENERAL. Nothing wrong with that advise. For the tenth time... I stand by my experience and advise on very careful and infrequent use of this product where specific goals are in mind. The analogy to a careful polish is appropriate. Isn't is actually a bit absurd on the interwebs to ask (a non professional enthusiast) to take responsibility for someone else's failure?
I appreciate what you're saying, that it works for you. My biggest concern, at least if we're using the polishing analogy, is that when polishing paint you can measure how much material you are removing at every point in the process. With an abrasive like ME on leather, there is no way to measure the urethane coating or know how much is being removed each time.
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      09-30-2011, 02:50 PM   #53
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Very good points Swamp.
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      09-30-2011, 02:51 PM   #54
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A simple solution would be to determine the actual abrasiveness of the ME, versus the abrasiveness of other products. How this would be possible I have no idea. Maybe you all do

If other products are less abrasive, then over time the ME will damage the leather sooner than the other products. Vice-versa if the ME is less abrasive. Seems simple, but it's true nonetheless.

swamp, what year is your vehicle? Maybe that's why I have no shine yet from the Leatherique and other products I've used since mine is a 2011. In all honesty, I do not clean my leather that often. I am about to treat it with some Leatherique this weekend because it's showing some signs of dirt buildup (I've been driving more lately). I wouldn't be against using the ME on some of the plastic/vinyl parts, but the leather makes me nervous.
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      09-30-2011, 02:56 PM   #55
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Originally Posted by Templar View Post
A simple solution would be to determine the actual abrasiveness of the ME, versus the abrasiveness of other products. How this would be possible I have no idea. Maybe you all do

If other products are less abrasive, then over time the ME will damage the leather sooner than the other products. Vice-versa if the ME is less abrasive. Seems simple, but it's true nonetheless.

swamp, what year is your vehicle? Maybe that's why I have no shine yet from the Leatherique and other products I've used since mine is a 2011. In all honesty, I do not clean my leather that often. I am about to treat it with some Leatherique this weekend because it's showing some signs of dirt buildup (I've been driving more lately). I wouldn't be against using the ME on some of the plastic/vinyl parts, but the leather makes me nervous.
When I used the ME on my leather, it was only on the portions with dirt build-up (..rub! wipe! check! ...and repeat). It was only enough to remove the dirt build-up in specific areas.
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      09-30-2011, 03:08 PM   #56
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So that's what this is about: that everything is abrasive, so there's no issue in using one thing that's much more abrasive than another?

Let me be clear in pointing out that there is nearly nothing that isn't abrasive in some way to something like clear-coat. I got your back on this. I'm a true believe in the thought that every time you touch your paint, you're either improving the surface quality, or deteriorating the surface. The only single time you're improving the surface is when you're polishing, and even wiping off polish residue, waxing/sealing, and of course washing puts the surface at risk. No doubt's about it. Dust has broken down dirt particles which have broken down sand particles which contain things like quartz, and there shouldn't be any doubt that your clear-coat is NOT harder than quartz. So if you want to talk about this in a fundamental way and discuss the inner workings of detailing - I'm game.

The important things to remember are treating things the best you can. Not just clear-coat, but leather, wheels, and even your body. People don't go tanning and get skin cancer. People don't smoke yet get lung cancer. This shouldn't be a sign that it's fine to take in as much UV rays as you can, or to chain smoke day after day. No one is debating on "perfection" as it's simply not attainable. I hope you don't think that I believe the soft bristled tooth brushes I use on leather aren't in any way abrasive. That's not realistic and not how physical agitation works. There absolutely is a level of abrasion there. What is important is using the least aggressive method as a way to preserve and maintain different automotive surfaces over time.

The two bucket wash method with Grit Guard inserts is a great way to mitigate risk of inducing washing-based swirls and marring. You will still cause marring / swirls, but much much less. You'll do much better to preserve your finish rather than using water without soap, a dirty mitt, and dirty beach towels to dry the car.
It is not acceptable to tell people that using water without shampoo with a dirty mitt and dirty beach towels is fine because there isn't a risk-free method of swirl-free washing.

This isn't just some dogma that I believe in because some other guy said it. Every step, every product, and every process is carefully thought out to help reduce risk and extend the life and longevity of all components. Other factors come into play as well such a diminishing returns. Not just on cost, but time, and energy too.

Spend $400 on leather care products, (to include dedicated microfiber towels), and wipe down your leather daily to help prevent the build-up of dirt and oils. Sure that's only 45 minutes a day maybe, but the return on the investment is so low, it's not worth doing for most people, to include me.
Spend $200 on products, wipe down your leather once a week. That's only an hour a week or so... but still not worth it for most people.
Spend nothing, neglect your leather. Well... that's not acceptable as well. There has to be a happy medium, and that point is different for all people. Some might have the same ideas and standards, but that doesn't make them universal. The type of people that come online to find better and "best" methods are looking for something more. They WANT to do better and want to figure out how to get the biggest return on the time, money, and energy they put in. Some people feel this way because they spent a lot of money on their car. Some do it because chicks dig nice rides. Some people just want to take good care of their possession regardless of how new or old or the value of the vehicle. Whatever the reason doesn't matter; it's just that they take the best care possible.
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      09-30-2011, 03:23 PM   #57
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MuttGrunt View Post
So that's what this is about: that everything is abrasive, so there's no issue in using one thing that's much more abrasive than another?

Let me be clear in pointing out that there is nearly nothing that isn't abrasive in some way to something like clear-coat. I got your back on this. I'm a true believe in the thought that every time you touch your paint, you're either improving the surface quality, or deteriorating the surface. The only single time you're improving the surface is when you're polishing, and even wiping off polish residue, waxing/sealing, and of course washing puts the surface at risk. No doubt's about it. Dust has broken down dirt particles which have broken down sand particles which contain things like quartz, and there shouldn't be any doubt that your clear-coat is NOT harder than quartz. So if you want to talk about this in a fundamental way and discuss the inner workings of detailing - I'm game.

The important things to remember are treating things the best you can. Not just clear-coat, but leather, wheels, and even your body. People don't go tanning and get skin cancer. People don't smoke yet get lung cancer. This shouldn't be a sign that it's fine to take in as much UV rays as you can, or to chain smoke day after day. No one is debating on "perfection" as it's simply not attainable. I hope you don't think that I believe the soft bristled tooth brushes I use on leather aren't in any way abrasive. That's not realistic and not how physical agitation works. There absolutely is a level of abrasion there. What is important is using the least aggressive method as a way to preserve and maintain different automotive surfaces over time.

The two bucket wash method with Grit Guard inserts is a great way to mitigate risk of inducing washing-based swirls and marring. You will still cause marring / swirls, but much much less. You'll do much better to preserve your finish rather than using water without soap, a dirty mitt, and dirty beach towels to dry the car.
It is not acceptable to tell people that using water without shampoo with a dirty mitt and dirty beach towels is fine because there isn't a risk-free method of swirl-free washing.

This isn't just some dogma that I believe in because some other guy said it. Every step, every product, and every process is carefully thought out to help reduce risk and extend the life and longevity of all components. Other factors come into play as well such a diminishing returns. Not just on cost, but time, and energy too.

Spend $400 on leather care products, (to include dedicated microfiber towels), and wipe down your leather daily to help prevent the build-up of dirt and oils. Sure that's only 45 minutes a day maybe, but the return on the investment is so low, it's not worth doing for most people, to include me.
Spend $200 on products, wipe down your leather once a week. That's only an hour a week or so... but still not worth it for most people.
Spend nothing, neglect your leather. Well... that's not acceptable as well. There has to be a happy medium, and that point is different for all people. Some might have the same ideas and standards, but that doesn't make them universal. The type of people that come online to find better and "best" methods are looking for something more. They WANT to do better and want to figure out how to get the biggest return on the time, money, and energy they put in. Some people feel this way because they spent a lot of money on their car. Some do it because chicks dig nice rides. Some people just want to take good care of their possession regardless of how new or old or the value of the vehicle. Whatever the reason doesn't matter; it's just that they take the best care possible.

Thanks for the post. One addition though...

...I NEVER get swirls because I never wash using circular motions, and I pat dry.
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      09-30-2011, 03:40 PM   #58
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So that's what this is about: that everything is abrasive, so there's no issue in using one thing that's much more abrasive than another?
...
Good, post, really. Agree with everything. I think we are pretty well at the point of understanding each other here and admitting that one size doesn't fit all. Thanks for the mostly tame discussion.
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      09-30-2011, 03:47 PM   #59
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A simple solution would be to determine the actual abrasiveness of the ME, versus the abrasiveness of other products. How this would be possible I have no idea. Maybe you all do
A real world test would be tough as you would need to have actual buildup on the leather (i.e.dirtied in a realistic way) since that layer most likely will provide a buffering action between the slightly abrasive ME and the leather itself.

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swamp, what year is your vehicle? Maybe that's why I have no shine yet from the Leatherique and other products I've used since mine is a 2011. In all honesty, I do not clean my leather that often. I am about to treat it with some Leatherique this weekend because it's showing some signs of dirt buildup (I've been driving more lately). I wouldn't be against using the ME on some of the plastic/vinyl parts, but the leather makes me nervous.
My car (see avatar) is a 2008. My normal "routine" is to simply wipe the interior including leather with MF (not ME, MF!) during/after each exterior cleaning. Perhaps with a very low concentration of regular car wash soap. Quick and easy. A time or two a year I use some of the highly recommended products for the leather. This routine led me to the shiny difficult to clean and very non-OEM looking leather, which was nicely corrected with ME. Personally I would actually be more nervous about ME on harder parts like plastic (or which I would never do - paint/clear coat).
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      09-30-2011, 03:55 PM   #60
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A real world test would be tough as you would need to have actual buildup on the leather (i.e.dirtied in a realistic way) since that layer most likely will provide a buffering action between the slightly abrasive ME and the leather itself.



My car (see avatar) is a 2008. My normal "routine" is to simply wipe the interior including leather with MF (not ME, MF!) during/after each exterior cleaning. Perhaps with a very low concentration of regular car wash soap. Quick and easy. A time or two a year I use some of the highly recommended products for the leather. This routine led me to the shiny difficult to clean and very non-OEM looking leather, which was nicely corrected with ME. Personally I would actually be more nervous about ME on harder parts like plastic (or which I would never do - paint/clear coat).
To some extent I agree here.
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      09-30-2011, 04:41 PM   #61
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Thanks for the post. One addition though...

...I NEVER get swirls because I never wash using circular motions, and I pat dry.
"Swirls" come in all shapes and sizes and aren't just installed from drying. It's at any point of touching your paint. Wax? Apply sealant with a DA? how do your remove your wax? How do you remove polish?
In all - you're doing the right thing in trying to minimize circular motions, and I'm sure it's had a very positive affect on how your car continues to look.


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Good, post, really. Agree with everything. I think we are pretty well at the point of understanding each other here and admitting that one size doesn't fit all. Thanks for the mostly tame discussion.
One size truly does not fit all, and it's always about finding the right fit for you. I struggled a bit finding the perfect application method for Leather Master products when I first got them in. Directions to gently wipe on the surface and wipe away with a clean towel seemed to yield surprisingly marginal results. I also tried a cotton applicator pad, a Swissvax leather brush, and a sponge, but nothing gave me the true results I was looking for. The surface still seemed contaminated with build-up that I was confident could be removed. I decided to use a little more physical agitation with a much slower going method: a toothbrush aka "the Fermani method." Bingo. The right amount of agitation with the right amount of work time with the right amount of concentration in a single area lead to outstanding results.
This method even works incredible on perforated leather (left side cleaned, right side untouched):




I've tried a lot of different things and have found things that work great. This is why I know how some things work. Don't forget I don't disagree in if a Magic Eraser CAN work, but rather if it's appropriate to use when less aggressive methods CAN work just as well. It's the same way I'd recommend to someone struggling to remove bug guts from their front bumper to try to clay the paint first (which is abrasive) rather than going right to sanding with 4,000 grit (which is more abrasive, though not the same as 400grit). Four-thousand grit marks would easily come out with 2-3 polishing steps, but it is best to always try a less aggressive method first. Work towards aggressive steps, now down from them.


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Originally Posted by Sedan_Clan View Post
To some extent I agree here.
Keep in mind a urethane coating on leather is very thin, while plastics are thick homogeneous layers of a substance. You aren't going to wear through plastic trim like you can wear through clear-coat or leather surface.
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      09-30-2011, 04:45 PM   #62
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And speaking of red leather, here's a look back at the red driver's side upper bolster off this "cleanest 135i"

Before:



After cleaning with Strong Cleaner with a sponge:

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      10-01-2011, 12:17 PM   #63
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^^^I often wonder how bolsters become cracked like that. Even after years of entering/exiting my vehicles, the leather never looks like that. Maybe it's HOW I exit? *shrug*
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      10-02-2011, 12:23 PM   #64
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Well just went through a weekend of big time cleaning and washing everything on the car. Pics to come

Spent about 10 hours total on my car, inside and out. Used Leatherique for the interior and I have to say it looks OEM to me. No shine, but it is definitely cleaner and looks closer to the way it looked when I bought the car over a year ago.

All I did was followed the directions on the Leatherique website. Put the oil on with my hands, rubbing it all over the leather. Parts that seemed a little more worn than others got a little extra treatment. I let it sit for a few hours in the sun, windows up. It was baking nice and good by the time it was done. Then I took a soft sponge with the Prestine Clean and wiped everything down nice and good. Wiped that off with a dry microfiber towel, then took a very slightly damp (with water) microfiber towel and did one last wipe down. Everything looks as good as new. It even smells new too.
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      10-03-2011, 07:43 AM   #65
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I used Leather Master to wipe down my shower this weekend. Worked out pretty well.
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      10-04-2011, 10:42 AM   #66
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sedan_Clan View Post
Thanks for the post. One addition though...

...I NEVER get swirls because I never wash using circular motions, and I pat dry.
Washing can and will induce some level of marring regardless of how you dry. Get a good light and take a look at your paint. I guarantee there are some very light spiderweb like marring from the sponge, mitt or other washing tool you may use.

On the leather topic I use leather master cleaner and protect and its a completely oem matte finish that is left behind
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