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      04-12-2010, 08:41 AM   #67
hayabusa55
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Quote:
Originally Posted by syhr View Post
+1, streetfight =/= groundfight.

Groundfighting is a sport which presumes rules, and a single opponent in unarmed combat. None of these presumptions apply in streetfighting.

In a streetfight, the last place you wanna be is tied to your opponent and lying on the ground (opponent); it limits your mobility and leaves you too open against multiple attackers.
I agree for the most part. Ground game might be useful for a quick takedown and ground and pound, although that's purely theoretical.

Quote:
Originally Posted by fezz93 View Post
There are lots of good opinions on this topic and I would like to share my 2 cents. My first MMA fight was in 1997 and I came from an Olympic freestyle background of 6 years then picked up Thai boxing and submission wrestling. I have been fortunate to have trained with some of the best guys; Josh Barnett (PRIDE, UFC, DREAM), Francisco Filho (K-1), Tsuyoshi Kohsaka(RINGS, PRIDE, UFC), Maurice Smith (K-1, UFC), Randy Couture, Frank Shamrock, to name a few.
Name dropper.

Quote:
Originally Posted by fezz93 View Post
-This is a sport, (have been in a bar fight where I mounted the guy and was kicked in the back of the head by the guys friend) night night time for me
So much for my ground and pound idea, although one can get sucker punched in any position.

Quote:
Originally Posted by fezz93 View Post
- I have trained at a lot of BJJ clubs that claim to be MMA, but they only teach sport BJJ and they commit both hands to an guard escapes and leave the face wide open, or side mount escapes that would leave you head crushed by elbows. The saying of make a BJJ black belt a brown belt by punching him in the face and keep hitting him until he is a white belt
Interesting. The BJJ gym I've trained at definitely involved strikes. Another one I tried out did exactly what you said. I guess it's all about personal preference. Some people prefer sport BJJ.

Quote:
Originally Posted by fezz93 View Post
-with respects to “brawlers” I would say that in most cases you cannot teach grit. You can settle people down with stress inoculation, but you just can’t teach someone to like being hit. Meaning that those guys in tough man contest who like to trade punches are a breed all of there own.
Something I need to work on.

Quote:
Originally Posted by fezz93 View Post
Some guy’s look good hitting a bag or pads and the second they get in the ring their game falls apart because they are more worried about not getting hit then they are about winning the fight. There are guys with grit that have almost no training in the gym that beat better guys just because they dont know how to lose. I have much respect for the bangers in the sprort.
What's the secret? Keep getting hit until you're used to it? I don't want to end up looking like Mickey Rourke.

Quote:
Originally Posted by fezz93 View Post
-gi is easier for most new people to pick up because the role is much slower and methodical. (very frustrating for wrestlers to be slowed down). No gi is more explosive and quick pace because it is harder to control the other person with nothing to hold on to and it is much easier to slip out of things.
I've had the same experience. I don't like gi because it seems so unrealistic.

Quote:
Originally Posted by fezz93 View Post
-Have no ego and you should never care if you get tapped out, because it is just training. There is nothing worse then 2 guys who just stale mate for 5- 10 mins because they fear being tapped out. A good training session would be giving up positions and working out of the submissions. Ex do not just stop and reset after someone taps out, instead after they tap, the person should just release pressure and allow the person to work an escape and continue the role.
Great advice.

Quote:
Originally Posted by fezz93 View Post
These are just some observations and experiences that I have had and believe me there is a price to be paid for the realistic training, but it is an amazing feeling to stand in a ring and face a man who has trained to fight you. That guy feels that he is going to beat you as much as you believe that you will beat him. It is no weakling that stands in front of you and there is no room for bullies in this world because the bluff is called as soon as the bell rings.
Great post!