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      01-10-2010, 11:24 PM   #6
foosh
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Drives: 2008 M3 E93
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Location: Annapolis, MD

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Quote:
Originally Posted by swamp2 View Post
Lots of incorrect things here guys.

1. When lug bolt threads and clean and dry you don't need and never should use lube on them. Clean the bolt and threads as required with acetone or brake cleaner and blow out/off with compressed air. Then install DRY. This does not depend on the climate you are in.

2. You should not vary the tightening torque based on the bolt manufacturer. Use a bolt that meets BMW specs and use BMW specs for torque, period.

3. Just for the sake of correctness, IF you happened to have lubricated threads the torque requirements will decrease. The goal of a torque spec is much more related to the correct tension in the fastener as opposed to some level of torque tightness. As such a lubed fastener will develop the equivalent tension to a non lubricated one at a significantly lower torque value. Dry torque values on a lubed fastener can cause yielding or failure of the base threads, fastener threads or even the fastener itself. However, a high strength steel lug bolt mating in the aluminum hat on the M3 will most likely damage the threads in the hat.
Yes, you are correct. I was trying to say the same thing and did, but you used a partial quote. The part you did quote, I expressed poorly and backwards. My main point is and was don't use anti-seize or any lube on lug bolts. The torque specs are for dry.

Since there is no lubed spec, the rest is rather irrelevant.

BTW, as you now know, anti-seize on spacers is a good thing.

Last edited by foosh; 01-10-2010 at 11:50 PM.
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