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      12-21-2007, 07:01 PM   #15
T Bone
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Quote:
Originally Posted by swamp2 View Post
Good observation. Perfect suggestion. However, like nearly all engines with their redlines placed far from the very conservative side, the torque curve will always fall off near the redline and the S2000 is not different is just falls only for about 500 rpm from redline whereas the M3 falls for about a full 2k. The engine just can not breath this quickly at its given size and hence the fall.



The minimum rpm and shape on this dyno biases the apperance of the sharp drop off as well. In reality the engine drops off (or builds depending on which way you trace the curve) from 1k to 3.5k as well. Most of this part of the curve is missing from this dyno. You can see the one that looks more similar to the reported dyno from BMW here.

Last but not least, one reason is to save some room for the CSL! This V8 is not maxed out.

I really don't understand why BMW M made this trade off though. If you look at the torque curves for the M5 / M6 V10, it is not linear and has a VTEC like hit at 5000 rpm+.....when mated with a 7 speed SMG box...that is a great combo.

When the M-DCT comes out, they are going to keep the engine in the part of the torque curve that is falling....it doesn't make sense to me. I realize it is not much but it is 10% plus.
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