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      03-12-2013, 01:15 AM   #25
jkim723
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Drives: E92 M3
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Cincinnati, OH

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Quote:
Originally Posted by HP Autowerks View Post
Motorsport's most advanced spring material

Swift made a name for itself on the tracks of Asia, Europe, and U.S. by defying all accepted concepts and speculations about the future, if any, in coil spring science.
When many other company were looking at expensive and brittle titanium composites to create the next evolution of springs, Swift was looking at reinventing the entire science of coil spring dynamics. Swift saw that most others are using the old regular silicone chrome material, which was not strong enough. It used a heat tempering method that damaged the strength of the material that requiring more coils, in turn, more weight.
The material was also suffering from a short life span. With springs like this leading the industries, Swift saw room for improvement.

Swift's R & D team created material, called H5S.TW, which is stronger then regular silicone chrome material. Because of this material, we could make the spring wire thinner, and could wind the springs with fewer coils, which greatly decreased weight while dramatically increasing available stroke.
Interesting, because I didn't know Swift was capable of "creating material". H5S.TW, I'm going to guess it stands for Japanese High 5 Super . Tensile Wire... Hooray.

Cr-Si is sufficient and strong enough for most aftermarket and OEM suspension spring applications. I'm curious to hear more reviews on these springs to see exactly how they compare to "not strong enough short life span" springs made from Cr-Si.