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      03-08-2013, 01:19 AM   #33
jjw2331
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Drives: 2011 JtBlk e92 M3
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Michigan

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Quote:
Originally Posted by sensi09 View Post
^Interesting combo with the FG400 and a white pad. Always planned to get some p203 for one stepping with a white pad, but never thought of using FG400.
Yup. FG400 saves a lot of time. My previous go to was Meguiars M105 and M205. Too much dusting and a lot of work. My paint is well maintained so FG400 is rarely needed. So far, I just use it for RIDS and problem areas (i.e. trunk lid, doors). My car may need a full run through in a couple years.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fen335i View Post
Isn't the FG400 pretty abrasive? One of my cars is Imola Red, which shows swirls and light scratches in the clear coat pretty easily. Should I go with something as hardcore as a Mazerna FG400, or try something a touch less abrasive?
Well, it depends.

When correcting, always start with the least aggressive pad and compound (can use even polish) on a small area to see what works. However, BMW paint is pretty hard. For example, using a DA orbital with a white lake country (very light cut) foam pad and wolfgang's total swirl remover 3.0 is not a bad starting point. If that doesn't remove the swirls and light scratches, step it up with wolfgang and a medium cut pad such as an orange lake country pad. Remember, technique is very important too.

You can go even stronger using a compound like Meguiars M105 with the same pad or a pad with more cut (i.e. yellow lake country) for deeper scratches. But remember, if you go that strong, you will be taking a good amount of clear coat and will need to go over the same area with polish to remove the fine scratches and marring the compound and cut pads left behind. I don't recommend it. Go about that step at your own risk or find a good detailer.

To be safe, make several passes (4-6) before stepping up. The great thing about all the equipment available is that you can adjust your approach according to the condition of the paint, making your job easier. But being able to determine that comes with experience. Hope that helps.