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      06-28-2012, 11:55 PM   #19
MiddleAgedAl
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Quote:
Originally Posted by M_Six View Post
And our family members in Canada constantly boast about their healthcare. So where are these Canadians and Europeans who have such a hard time getting medical care?
Proper studies involving thousands of sample points can often paint a more accurate picture than the anecdotes of a friend or relative...



"The results of this year’s survey indicate that despite high levels of health expenditure and provincial wait time strategies, it is clear that patients in Canada are waiting too long to receive treatment."
http://www.fraserinstitute.org/publi...?id=2147484001


"It's becoming clearer that Canada's current health-care system cannot meet the needs of Canadians in a timely and efficient manner, unless you consider access to a waiting list timely and efficient"
http://www.cbc.ca/news/health/story/...es-fraser.html


"One dimension of the ECHI in which Canada fared particularly poorly was waiting times for medical services. In fact, Canada was among the very worst performers in this component of the index."
http://www.fcpp.org/publication.php/3222


And keep in mind, Canada has had universal health care for decades, so the system has had ample time to grow to meet the demands of the increasing population. What happens if you dump tens of millions of new people into the system at once, rather than the slow increase normally associated with population growth?

I dunno, it just seems to me that the likelihood of this causing a huge strain and backlogs on the system is higher than the chances of it absorbing this huge spike smoothly. That will decrease the quality of care for everybody.