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      03-30-2012, 01:47 AM   #288
swamp2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by db71 View Post
All good points but the test is stated as such that if you use the most extreme offset and width which put the spokes at the least strength. Then all wheels inside that realm pass also. Now that is assuming you are testing to the amount of weight you need to be. I would think wheels tested at 1750# and twice that for cornering fatigue would be more than adequate for just about any small body car.

Once again I have the SAE test in PDF if anyone wants to see it.
Which standard states this, SAE, TUV, JWL, etc.

The problem with this point of view is that inside a given forging envelope the spoke cross section does not necessarily have to be exactly the same shape just a different thickness. The curvature, radii and other subtleties can also change. Thus again right back to my point about having a engineer in the loop.

Quote:
Originally Posted by db71 View Post
Another thing is that testing of the rim widths is done by the rim manufacturer. The only thing that is really being tested is the design in the forging.
I was not aware that multiple companies doing different parts of a wheel take part in the responsibility for the safety of a given design. Could it be different for 1 piece vs. multi-piece wheels? It shouldn't be regardless of who makes what THE wheel manufacturer should (and does I believe) assume ALL responsibility for the safety of the final complete wheel.
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