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      12-29-2011, 02:32 PM   #4
Gearhead999s
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Quote:
Originally Posted by THE TECH View Post
I guess vintage just means year the car was made since no Galaxie ever produced by Ford made 600hp.
This refers to the 427 SOHC which was never a production engine.

Quote:
The engines were essentially hand-built with racing in mind. Combustion chambers were fully machined to reduce variability. Nevertheless, Ford recommended blueprinting the engines before use in racing applications. With a single four-barrel carburetor they were rated at 616 horsepower (459 kW) at 7,000 rpm & 515 ft·lb (698 N·m) of torque @ 3,800 rpm, and while equipped with dual four-barrel carburetors they made 657 horsepower (490 kW) at 7,500 rpm & 575 ft·lb (780 N·m) of torque @ 4,200 rpm. Ford sold them via the parts counter, the single four-barrel model as part C6AE-6007-363S, the dual carburetor model as part C6AE-6007-359J for $2350.00 (as of October, 1968). Weight of the engine was 680 lb (308 kg).[34]
Quote:
427

Ford's 427 in³ (7.0 L) V8, introduced in 1963, was a racing engine pure and simple. It was developed for NASCAR stock car racing, drag racing, and serious street racers. The true displacement of the 427 was actually 425 in³ (6,965 cm³), but Ford called it the 427 because 427 in³ (7.0 L) was the NASCAR maximum size. The block was made of high nickel content iron and was made with an especially thickened deck to withstand higher compression. The cylinders were cast using cloverleaf molds—the corners were thicker all down the wall of each cylinder. Forged pistons were employed (the only production Ford big-block with such) and forged rods inherited from the 390 Hi-Po.



Two different models of 427 block were produced, the 427 top oiler and 427 side oiler. The top oiler version was the earlier, and delivered oil to the cams first and the crank second. It gained something of an undeserved reputation for insufficient crankshaft lubrication under heavy abuse. When under extremely hard acceleration oil in the pan would tend to slosh back. This was remedied by Ford later by including a factory windage tray under the main bearings. The FE engine was Ford's main race engine in the mid-1960s and as such was under constant engineering scrutiny and subject to frequent design updates based on extreme racing experiences. The side oiler block, introduced in 1965, sent oil to the crank first and the cams second. In street use the two blocks are equivalent. Today, the premium aftermarket aluminum replacement block uses a top-oiler system.



The engine was available with low-riser, mid-riser, or high-riser intake manifolds, and either a single four-barrel carburetor or a double four-barrel setup on an aluminum manifold for highest performance. The twin four-barrel setup with the high-riser induction system is estimated to have delivered over 500 hp (373 kW); Ford never released an official power rating. Other models were rated at over 400 hp (299&nbs



427 SOHC

The Ford Single Overhead Cam (SOHC) 427 V8 engine, familiarly known as the Cammer, was developed by Ford Motor Company in 1964 to recapture NASCAR dominance from the Chrysler Hemi engine.



The engine was based on the ultra high performance 427 side-oiler block, in the Ford FE engine family, providing race-proven durability. The block and associated parts were largely unchanged, the main difference being use of an idler shaft instead of the camshaft in the block, which necessitated plugging the remaining camshaft bearing oiling holes.



The heads, of course, were entirely new, cast iron with hemispherical combustion chambers and a single overhead camshaft on each head, operating shaft-mounted roller rocker arms. Valves are larger than those on Ford wedge head engines, stainless steel, with sodium-filled exhaust valves to prevent the valve heads from burning, and dual valve springs. This design allowed for high volumetric efficiency at high engine speed, ensuring enormous power. Unlike the Chrysler Hemi design, the spark plugs are not centered in the combustion chamber, but are near the intake valves for easier accessibility.



The idler shaft in the block in place of the camshaft was driven by the timing chain and drove the distributor and oil pump in conventional fashion, with the same practical limit of about 7,000 rpm for the stock oil pump (a maximum of 20.5 US gallons (78 L) of SAE 40W per minute at 70 psi (480 kPa). An additional sprocket on this shaft drove a second, six foot long timing chain, which drove both overhead camshafts. The length of this chain made precision timing of the camshafts a problem at high rpm and necessitated a complex system of idlers.



The engine also had a then-state-of-the-art transistorized ignition system, running 12 amperes of current through a high voltage ignition coil.



All these engines were essentially hand-built, with racing in mind. Combustion chambers were fully machined to reduce variability. Nevertheless, Ford recommended blueprinting the engines before use in racing applications. They were rated at 615 hp (458 kW) at 7,000 rpm with a single four barrel carburetor, and 657 hp (490 kW) at 7,500 rpm with dual four barrel carburetors. Ford sold them via the parts counter, the single four-barrel model as part C6AE-6007-363S, the dual carburetor model as part C6AE-6007-359J for $2350.00 (as of October, 1968). Weight of the engine was 680 lb (308 kg).



Ford's plan was cut short, however; although Ford sold enough to have the design homologated, NASCAR effectively legislated the SOHC engine out of competition through rule changes, and the awaited 1965 Ford SOHC vs. Chrysler Hemi competition at the Daytona 500 season opener never occurred. The engine found its niche in drag racing, however, powering many A/FX Factory Experimental Mustangs, and becoming the basis for a few supercharged Top Fuel dragsters.





Last edited by Gearhead999s; 12-29-2011 at 02:38 PM.